Monthly Archives: June 2018

Win God of War/Detroit Become Human thanks to GameJunkieNZ & PriceSpy

SPONSORED POST

When there’s a new game release out, there’s nothing more frustrating than buying it, only to
find that when get home, you could have otherwise purchased that very same game
elsewhere for cheaper!
PriceSpy is New Zealand’s biggest comprehensive, fully impartial price and product
comparison service that aims to help consumers shop smartly and save money.
Used by approximately one million users each month in New Zealand, PriceSpy can be
downloaded for free via a handy app. The app provides shoppers instant access to 95,000
indexed prices,1,840,000 products, 4,130,000 product features and hundreds of thousands
of product and shop ratings, so they can make informed purchase decisions.
Simply search by product features, popularity, brand, price, user reviews and much more. If
that’s not enough, the app also allows shoppers to click on the price and popularity history of
a particular product they are looking to buy, to reveal whether shops are offering the item at
the best price possible!
What’s especially useful, is you also have the ability to create price change notifications.
These send push notifications direct to your phone, so that if the price of the item you are
looking to buy changes – you never need be caught out again!
So, when looking to buy your next game for your collection, avoid that dreadful feeling of
buyer’s remorse. Download the PriceSpy app for yourself, to see just how much money you
can save.
PriceSpy has teamed up with GameJunkie NZ to offer one lucky reader the opportunity to
win PriceSpy’s two most popular games in May 2018: God of War (PS4) and Detroit:
Become Human (PS4).
To enter, simply email gamejunkienz@gmail.com, telling me why you deserve to win the two games.
Important things you need to know: 
 Once the winner has been drawn, PriceSpy / GameJunkieNZ will be in touch to organise delivery of the two games.

 The competition is open to New Zealand residents only with a New Zealand postal address.  Sorry, overseas readers: You can’t enter.

 One entry per email address. PriceSpy/GameJunkieNZ’s decision is final.

Pre-E3 press conferences: Day 1

Microsoft held its traditional pre-E3 press conference today and I think Phil Spencer must have read my blog from the other week saying I thought Xbox had lost its way a little, as today’s pre-show presser showed that the company has realised that the Xbox One needs good games for people to play.

The show opened with a teaser trailer for Halo Infinite (then that was it for the show, which I found strange) and Xbox claims to have showcased more than 50 games, including “18  console launch exclusives and 15 world premieres”.

Games that got my attention were Ori & the Will of the Wisps, Devil May Cry 5, Gears Pop! and Gears Tactics, Tunic, Metro Exodus, From Software’s Seiko Shadows Die Twice and CD Projekt’s Cyberpunk 2077  (see the trailers below).

Another game that looks mighty interesting is The Awesome Adventures of Captain Spirit, a free game from DontNod Studios, the team behind Life is Strange.

Another interesting announcement from Xbox was that it had acquired five new studios, including Hellblad Senua’s Sacrifice developer Ninja Theory, Playground Games (Forza Horizon 4) and Undead Labs (State of Decay).

I also watched Bethesda’s pre-show presser between doing work and while full of a few cringe moments, Todd Howard was the standout presenter and nailed it when he presented Fallout 76, an online game set in the Fallout universe.

PlayStation & Nintendo tomorrow (Nintendo at the ungodly hour of 4am so I might wait for the highlights package later in the day).

Let the nights of broken sleep begin!

D-Link Covr C1203: Enveloping your home in Wi-fi goodness

D-Link Covr C1203 seamless Wi-fi system ($599,99)

D-Link’s Covr C1203 system is the solution for when you have shit Wi-fi around your home.

I have shit Wi-fi in my house and chances are, if your house is anything like mine, the further you get away from the router  (mine’s located behind my TV in the main lounge at the front of the house), the shittier the wi-fi connection gets. Heck, before I installed the Covr C1203 system I was struggling to pick up a decent wi-fi signal from the kitchen, which is maybe 8m to 10m away from the router in the lounge.

After countless calls to the ISP’s helpdesk and tweaking of settings, things didn’t improve much: Sometimes we’d be watching Netflix using Apple TV over wi-fi and the picture quality would suddenly degrade to SD for a few minutes before cranking back up to HD. It was less than ideal.

D-Link’s Powerline solution.

Now, being the techie that I am, I’m not happy with sub-par wi-fi so before the Covr C1203 system, I bought a D-Link’s Wi-fi boosting Powerline solution, which you plug into a power socket and it boosts the internet signal using the electrical wiring in your house.

While adequate, speeds were pretty flakey at times and it wasn’t all that reliable, with the signal dropping out from time to time, I was still able to surf the web and watch Netflix easy enough using Wi-fi but couldn’t watch a streaming service like SkyTV’s Neon, which just refused to load.

D-Link’s Covr C1203 claims it’ll give up to 1200Mbps Wi-fi and each unit has three receiving antennas, which means it’ll detect the Wi-fi signal easier and provide a consistent signal. Set-up was easy enough using D-Link’s Android app. You can either use the default network name or create your own and you connect the base station to you router then dot the secondary stations around your house (the kit came with two secondary stations).

Once powered on, a  flashing white Covr logo on top of the base station means a weak wi-fi signal and a solid white logo means a solid Wi-fi signal. I had to move the around the house until I was happy with the signal.

D-Link’s Covr C1203 solution in its natural environment.

The Covr C1203 is what is called a mesh system, meaning it envelopes your house in a wi-fi, um, net, meaning there are no dead spots and you’ve got consistent coverage between the base stations. I was now getting Wi-fi all around the house: No more flakey speeds, no more buffering streams.

I took a few days to find the right placement for the secondary nodes. I originally had one in the kitchen and one in the laundry but the signal wasn’t the strongest so every day or so I moved one or two to another location: laundry, bathroom, my bedroom. I finally settled on one secondary node in bedroom 1 and the second in bedroom 2. If you measured a line from the base station in the lounge to the node in bedroom 2, you’d pretty much have a straight line from point A to point B. Each node has two ethernet ports as well.

My house is, I suspect, a pretty typical one of its time period: Build in the late 1990s, it has timber framing with a brick exterior. It’s around 225sqm in size but has a few walls between where the router is and the bedroom end of the house. I tested the wi-fi signal from three points around the house before I installed the Cover C1203.

Pre Covr testing: Lounge: 256Mbps down, 350Mbps up; bedroom 1: 69.1Mbps down, 19.5Mbps up; My bedroom: Failed the test (no signal)

Post-Covr installation: Lounge: 334Mbps down, 248Mbps up; bedroom 1: 81.2Mbps down, 102Mbps up; My bedroom:52.9Mbps down, 63.8Mbps up.

I’m impressed with the Covr C1203. Now, I can watch Neon on my iPad in HD in my bedroom and not skip a beat: It’s seamless and buffer free. We get strong wi-fi speeds right around the house now, which is something we didn’t get when both my children were at home – and they constantly complained about it.

Thanks to D-Link’s Covr system, I’m now getting decent Wi-fi speeds all over the house, which I’m really stoked about, especially during those cold winter nights when I can stay in bed and watch movies or early-morning E3 press conferences.

One thing that would have been nice to be able to do with the smartphone app is turn off or turn down the brightness of the illumination on the base station’s cover: It can easily light up an entire room when it’s pitch black. Apparently you can do that in the system’s web-based menu system but try as I might, I just wasn’t able to access it either through the covr.local website or the router4’s IP address.

Thanks to D-Link and its Covr solution, I’m a happy chappy.

Thanks for D-Link ANZ for the review unit.

Bite-sized review: Little Nightmares Complete Edition (Nintendo Switch)

Little Nightmares Compete Edition (Version reviewed: Nintendo Switch, review code kindly  provided by Bandai Namco)

What is it? Little Nightmares Complete is a side-scrolling  horror/puzzle game from indie game developer Tarsier Studios that tells the tale of a mysterious girl called Six who must negotiate a vessel called the Maw through three story chapters: The Depths, The Hideaway and The Residence. This complete edition also includes  all the DLC that was released for the game, including the story of The Kid (a second playable character) and the Secret of the Maw expansion storyline. Little Nightmares can best be compared to games like Limbo or Inside as all three games have a creepy, unsettling undertone to them that might just well have you having nightmares yourself.

The Janitor in search mode. Time for Six to hide.

So, it’s a horror. Is it scary? Well, it’s not blood and guts scary, but it’s more creepy, uncomfortable scary, with nightmarish creatures inhabiting the Maw, doing unspeakable things. The game succeeds in creating a tense atmosphere that’s unsettling at times. Making things more uncomfortable are the Maw’s creepy residents, which often force Six (and The Kid) into a game of hide and seek as they skulk around quietly, careful not to draw the attention of the grotesque beasts such as The Janitor, who has incredibly long arms and bandages wrapped around his eyes, or The Lady, the proprietor of The Maw who just seems a little … not quite right.

This is Six exploring The Maw. Quite unsettling, isn’t it?

Is there anything else I need to know about? Little Nightmare’s does a great job of creating tension and has a great visual style, which is really suited to the Switch but the experience is marred a little by the long loading times after you die, and you will die a lot, thanks to at-times-clumsy controls and at times hard-to-judge jump puzzles. The game is also quite dark visually when played in portable mode but holds up well when played in docked mode. Both run at 720p, 30 frames a second.

So, what did you think overall? Tarsier Studios does an excellent job in creating a macabre and creepy narrative with a nice twist in that one of the lead characters turns out to be more than she initially appears. If you’re a fan of games that create creepy tension in unsettling environments, then Little Nightmares is worth a look but just be prepared for some frustrating jump puzzles and long load times between deaths.

Thanks to Bandai Namco for the review code