Stars Wars Republic Commando: One of the finest Star Wars games ever made – but we’ll never see a sequel

Trawling through You Tube the other night, I came across an excellent short by YouTube site GVMERS on the history of the superb Star Wars shooter Republic Commando.

After I watched it, I decided to hunt out my original Xbox copy of the game (which I still have, thankfullyl), Googled whether it would work on my Xbox 360 (it does: Apparently it may work on the Xbox One as well?), inserted the disc, applied a small update patch, and fired it up.

I was transported back to Star Wars gaming nirvana.

Along with FPS Dark Forces, space shooter X-Wing vs Tie Fighter and the wonderful Jedi Knight series, Republic Commando is still one of the greatest Star Wars games of all time. It is, believe me.

dd56a48dbf4f8343759e68efedbcaa74Republic Commando is a great game because it came when LucasArts still made Star Wars games and before the franchise was gobbled up by Disney and the game licenses given to EA to squander. I spent countless hours controlling Kyle Katarn (a stormtrooper who became a rebel fighter) as a burgeoning jedi knight and shooting dark troopers in Dark Forces.

Sure, Republic Commando’s graphics don’t stand up to today’s realistic visuals – where talking about a game that launched on the original Xbox around the mid-2000s – but believe me, the narrative and the game play (set around the time of George Lucas’ second trilogy of movies: Episodes one, two and three) still stand the test of time as you lead a rag-tag quartet of Republic Commandos, each with their own personality (something that is intriguing given republic soldiers are all clones), battling separatist forces on the bug-infested planet of Geonosis.

[Look, I’m not wearing rose-coloured glasses, thinking every single Star Wars game was the second-coming of gaming, because I don’t: There were some real stinkers, but games like Knights of the Old Republic, Dark Forces, the Jedi Knight series and Republic Commando are classics.]

But back to Republic Commando. What makes me love Republic Commando so much as an example of a Star Wars game with a single player campaign done right is that players control one of the Republic’s elite soldiers and it feels so damn badass doing it. The game play feels solid and it’s a nice tangent from the Star Wars movies.

Republic Commando is a game that brings me so much joy despite being years old but I know we will never see a sequel to this amazing game because Disney (and, I guess by extension, EA because it has the SW games license) just doesn’t have any idea what make great narrative-driven Star Wars game. Heck, I’d love to see a re-master of Republic Commando for current-generation consoles and PC. How good would that be??

Disney proved in 2013 that it has no idea what makes a good Star Wars game when it cancelled Star Wars 1313, a game that showed massive amounts of promise in a short 15-minute demo. Sadly, I also don’t have a lot of faith in EA’s up coming Star Wars game from Titanfall developer Respawn Entertainment.

Now, don’t get me wrong: I have the utmost faith in Respawn and Vince Zampella – Titanfall 2 was one of my favourite games of 2016 – but I am seriously concerned that EA will pressure Respawn to forgo a solid, narrative-driven single player campaign (like Titanfall 2’s), making it concentrate on a micro-transaction-laden multiplayer campaign. EA doesn’t care about single player games: All it cares about is MP game that can reap it financial rewards.

Look, I’d like to be proven wrong with Respawn’s Star Wars game – and I really, really hope I am – but I just don’t think Disney and EA care about the narrative-driven Star Wars games, and that makes me sad. Very, very, very sad.

Of course, I’m speculating wildly about EA and Disney and they may surprise us with an amazingly good Star Wars game with a worthwhile single player campaign in the coming years, but I’m not holding my breath.

I guess I’ll just have to keep playing the Star Wars games from the past to get my Star Wars video game fix.

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