Monthly Archives: February 2019

Crackdown 3 review: Punch bad buys and collect the magic orbs

Microsoft’s Crackdown series can be summed up thus: Collect magic orbs then punch bad guys into the air and jump really, really high.

OK, that might be a little simplistic but c’mon, nobody ever played Crackdown for the story. They played it because you didn’t have to think too deeply about what you are doing – and you got to blow stuff up and jump around collecting agility orbs.

The original Crackdown launched on the Xbox 360 in 2007 and fast forward a few years and the latest installment in the Crackdown series is now out, Numero 3 now lets you … collect magic orbs then punch bad guys into the air and jump really, really high.

Crackdown 3, which was first revealed in 2014, has had something of a protracted development cycle, but, surprisingly, after years of reveals and teasing, it was launched last week with little fanfare by Microsoft Games. To me, that’s not a good sign of faith in a game.

Taking place in a cartoonish city dripping with bright neon called New Providence, the story is pretty generic and believe me when I say you won’t be playing Crackdown 3 for the narrative, which involves you – as Super Agent – taking down the leader of an evil corporation called TerraNova, which is masquerading as a good community citizen but is, actually, the complete opposite.

Most of the marketing around Crackdown 3 has been done involving former NFL player and now actor Terry Crews, and its good thinking on Microsoft’s part: Crews is larger than life (with larger than life biceps) so who better to cast as a genetically altered super agent who delivers the smack to wayward robots, mindless goons and organised hit squads and taking the city back, neon-coloured sector by sector.

Like the original Crackdown, the key to increasing your super agent abilities is upgrading them by collecting the glowing orbs dotted around the city. The five abilities are agility, firearms, explosives, driving and strength and you can focus on particular attributes to develop. A definite highlight of the game is that unmistakable “ting” again as you collect an orb.

Want to become a crack-shot marksman? Just use as many firearms as you can. Want to be able to drift and turn and pull off incredible driving feats? Just drive more. Want to be able to stronger? Just pick up stuff and throw it – and punch people. The more you use those particular skills, the stronger you become in that discipline.

There is no denying Crackdown 3’s campaign is fun, but truth be told, after a handful of hours, I found myself losing interest in the generic story and instead focusing on hunting down agility orbs. Truth be told, I found that more satisfying than delivering the boom to goon squads and bosses.

After a few hours of capturing monorail stations, freeing imprisoned citizens, destroying giant mining facilities and hijacking propaganda towers, though, I felt like I’d experienced all Crackdown 3 had to offer.

Some games, for example, are so engaging, so engrossing that I think about them when I’m not playing them. That didn’t happen with Crackdown 3. Not once.

Sadly, Crackdown 3 is a victim of being hyped up to the point that it could never deliver on what it originally promised and the result is a rather average third-person action game. It actually feels like a remaster of the original – which came out 12 years ago – but it’s not. It has nothing that makes it stand out from the crowd, and that’s a shame.

Even Microsoft’s grandiose plans of offering destructible environments where skyscrapers could be destroyed, causing them to topple onto other buildings (all thanks to the power of “The Cloud” ), has been relegated to the game’s multiplayer Wrecking Zone mode, which I haven’t had a chance to check out yet.

Look, Crackdown 3 is one of those games that you don’t have to engage your brain too much when you play it, which is what you want to do from time to time, I get that, but to me, there’s nothing here that captured my attention and wanted me to play it ahead of other games. The formula has stayed the same since the original Crackdown and  in the 12 years between the original and number 3, I would have liked to have seen some innovation and not just the same game with a fresh coat of paint.

For owners of Xbox’s Game Pass service, however, Crackdown 3 is a no brainer as it’s free for subscribers of the service, but for me, it’s an average game that fails to deliver on the lofty hype that was heaped upon it in the lead up to its release.

Yes, it’s some more Metro Exodus stuff but with some Sekiro, too

Yes, this is the second Metro Exodus post in as many days but, c’mon, I don’t have any games or anything at the moment. I’m contemplating a nice opinion piece but until that has come to fruition … it’s some more Metro Exodus … also a story trailer for Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, which comes from FromSoftware, the crazy minds behind Bloodborne & the Dark Souls series.

Firstly, though, the third part in the Making of Metro Exodus mini-documentaries. So, without further ado, here’s part three:

Metro Exodus is landing next week!

Also worth having a look is the story preview trailer for Sekiro, a game set in late 1500s Sengoku Japan, said by the developers to have been a “brutal period of constant life and death conflict”. It’s not long – just over a minute – so I’m guessing we’ll see something with a little more meat as the month progress.

You can have a gander at it here:

Artyom’s Nightmare: Entering the world of Metro Exodus

Metro Exodus, the next game in one of my favourite shooter series of all time (it really is), is close, dear readers, very, very, very close.

How close? So close you can almost taste its radioactive source code.

It’s out next week, actually (February 15) and to celebrate its imminent arrival, Deep Silver and 4A Games have released Artyom’s Nightmare”, a 4 minute something CGi short that acts as a prologue to Exodus where it explores main character Artyom’s hopes and fears of a life beyond the ruins of the Moscow Metro.

If you’re a fan of the series, it’s well worth a look and sets the scene for what we can expect in Metro Exodus.

The countdown for Artyom’s return has begun …

 

Oppo AX7 smartphone review

For as budget priced, mid-range phone, Oppo really has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the AX7.

It really doesn’t look – or feel – like a budget smart phone.

Clad in a colour that Oppo describes as glaze blue, the AX7 feels comfortable in the hand, with a nice weight to it, and the attention to detail in the small – but noticeable – details like the camera lens surround means Oppo’s latest phone will get noticed.

Powered by a Snapdragon 450 octa-core CPU, the AX7 comes with a 6.2-inch HD+ display, 4Gb of RAM and is running Oppo’s ColorOS 5.2 (based on Android 8.2) but weirdly, just 64Gb of internal storage space, which in this day and age of digital consumption doesn’t really cut the mustard these days. Thankfully, the storage can be expanded via microSD card (upto 256Gb). A nice touch is the SIM card tray has space for two SIMs, meaning you can use the phone as your work mobile and private number.

The AX7 comes with all the latest bells and whistles you’d expect, including a fingerprint scanner. If I had one gripe about the scanner it would be that I thought it was perhaps positioned a little too high and could be a tad deeper, so that it’s easy to find first time. That said, it’s fast enough when it comes to unlocking the handset.

I was pleasantly surprised with the phone’s battery life, with the 4230mAh battery lasting a good couple of days with moderate use (phone calls, texting, browsing, the odd YouTube video). I’m still not sold on Oppo’s ColorOS operating system, which can be a little slow at times.

Perhaps the star of the AX7, though, is the camera, which sports 13MP and 2MP sensors at the back and a 16MP sensor at the front. It’s a selfie star, according to Oppo, although I’m not big on selfies, to be honest. Sure the customisation options for the camera are limited when compared to more expensive phones but it’s a good, honest shooter that will do what it says on the tin.

Photos taken with the AX7 were clear and sharp, with bright colours and details, although I thought sometimes the images were a little over saturated at times.

Perhaps the best thing about the AX7, though, is the price. Oppo has set the RRP at $399, which means it’s within reach for average consumers. I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: Not everyone needs a $1000-plus smart phone (realistically, does anyone, really?) and like Huawei with its budget-priced Nova 3i, Oppo have created a nice-looking, well-performing smart phone that does everything you need without requiring you to mortgage the house, give up a kidney or sell your first-born.

Look, the AX7 isn’t going to compete in terms of lightning fast performance of higher end smartphones and with Oppo’s own rather great R17 Pro, but then, it’s not designed to. It offers great value for money with a battery that will go the distance (I’m still not 100% sold on ColorOS, though).

What’s not to like?

A big thanks to Oppo NZ for providing the AX7 for review.