Oppo A9 2020 review

To say I’ve been impressed with Oppo handsets is an understatement.

I’ve reviewed a few Oppo handsets over the past few years: The budget-focused AX7, the more pricey Reno 10x zoom and the R17 Pro and all three have impressed the hell out of me with their mix of smart design and great performance.

This time around, I’m looking at an Oppo at the other end of the scale: The mid-range A9 2020, which retails for around $500, and frankly, it’s a cracker.

Running ColorOS 6.0 (Oppo’s UI software layered over the base Android 9.0 OS), the A9 2020 sports a 6.5-inch OLED screen and is powered by a quad-core Snapdragon 665 CPU. A 5000mAh battery will give you a days worth of use before needing a charge, 8Gb of RAM, 128Gb of storage (expandable to 256Gb via MicroSD), and stereo speakers with Dolby Atmos round out the package. Surprisingly, it also allows for a dual SIM setup, handy if you want to combine a work phone and personal phone into one handset.

It also has a four-camera setup: a 48 megapixel main camera, an 8MP ultra-wide lens (119 degrees), a 2MP mono lens and a 2MP portrait lens. More about the camera later, though.

Like the more expensive Reno 10x zoom, the A9 has a nice heft to it and feels weighty in the hand when you pick it up. Despite being a budget phone, a fingerprint scanner just under the three main camera lenses allows for fast unlocking, as does the facial recognition which allows you to unlock the handset just by looking at it.

The A9 2020 sports a 1600×720 resolution screen and is vivid, bright and responsive. Sure it’s not the more common-these-days 1080p resolution, but for my money, on a 6.5-inch smartphone screen, the difference is inperceptible to my old eyes, anyway.

Turn the Oppo over and you’ll notice the array of camera lenses cascading down from the central top of the phone. I used the A9’s camera in a variety of situations.

Here’s a selection of photos taken with the Oppo’s camera.

Outdoor photos seemed natural with clear, crisp images but images captured using the night mode were quite grainy. The A9’s camera’s strength is definitely daylight photos.

Keen to test out the phone’s gaming prowess, I tested it on 3D Mark’s Sling Shot Extreme benchmark (Open GL ES 3.1 & Vulkan APIs), returning scores of 1089 and 1057 (placing it 1% better than Huawai’s Mate 10 Pro).

One feature that Oppo promotes is the Game Boost 2.0 software, which supposedly optimises the phone for when you play games: blocking notifications and phone calls so you get an uninterrupted gaming experience. I tested the A9 2020 with Deus Ex Go, a rather superb mobile game based on SquareEnix’s Deus Ex series, and Gameloft’s Asphalt 9: Legends, a racing game that would push the phone to its limits. I also selected the software’s competitive mode setting (which is said to improve performance and frame rates but will use more power).

In Asphalt 9, the Oppo seemed to perform pretty well and I didn’t notice any perceptible lag. I also tested the A9 202 with the Antutu benchmarking suite which stress tests phone hardware using a variety of tests. The Oppo returned a score of 171,239, telling me the phone “defeated 12% of users” [I wasn’t really sure what that meant, to be honest, as it didn’t provide details of what users it had defeated].

Oppo is a handset manufacturer that continues to astound and impress me with its smartphone offerings and it’s done it again with the A9 2020, a mid-range smart phone that packs high-end features but has a low end price.

If you’re in the market for a good price mid-range phone, you should definitely consider the A9 2020 in the mix.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s