JBL Quantum 600 headset review

Byte-sized review

Not so long ago on this blog, I reviewed JBL’s Quantum 300 wired gaming headset which I said “My ears were in audio heaven with the aural goodness being fired into them from these JBL ear cans.

Now, JBL have sent through one of the 300s bigger siblings: The Quantum 600, a wireless gaming headset that is clearly aimed at gamers –  although you can use it for other things like video conferencing (but, personally, I wouldn’t.)

Targeting PC gamers, the Quantum 600s connect to your PC using a thin USB dongle that plugs into a free USB slot. You can also use them with consoles using the USB dongle – such as a PlayStation 4 – or the supplied connection cable that has dual 3.5mm headphone jacks if you want (Nintendo Switch).

The pairing button/on-off switch is housed in the right ear cup, while the rotary dials that controls the volume and chat and microphone functions are integrated into left air cup.

The Quantum 600 is comfortable with nice padding on the ear cups and head band and being wireless, they’re certainly heavier than the wired 300s, with a sturdy braided cable snaking out of each ear cup into the headband. Tipping the scales at 346grams, they’re definitely heavier than my personal favourite headphones: Bose’s QC 35s.

That said, I didn’t find the extra heft annoying while I was wearing them and it didn’t cause me any discomfort but it’s just something to be wary of if you plan to do extended gaming sessions. I didn’t get “hot ears” either while wearing them.

The foam around the ear cups is thick enough to offer a little bit of noise cancelling but they won’t drown out external noise: you can still people talking if they’re in the same room as you. They’re charged using USB C.

You can adjust the tempo of the RGB lighting on each earcup.

When using them on your PC, you can tweak a variety of settings using JBL’s Quantum Engine software, like the sound field you want (DTS, JBL’s Quantum surround), microphone and chat levels, and manage the RGB lighting of the JBL logo on each ear cup, which ranges from the lighting pattern to how long each colour is active for.  If you love a bit of RGB bling, these things will make you smile from ear to ear.

When you use the USB dongle on your console you don’t have access to the Quantum Engine software so you can’t tweak RGB settings or sound options, you’ll just have to make so with whatever surround sound option the game itself supports, which is what I did.

Sound is incredibly good, too, with the headphones offing not only DTS surround sound but 7.1 audio and I tested them with Sucker Punch’s Ghost of Tsushima (PlayStation 4)  and the PC version of Death Stranding.

You can select the type of surround sound using JBL’s Quantum Engine software.

Minute details popping around my head as I slashed mongol invaders through the island of Tsushima or tip toed through BT infested landscapes, hoping not to be sucked into a pool of black goo. I really was impressed by the sound quality with these headphones while gaming.

The only non-gaming thing I did with the Quantum 600s was use it during a work Teams call and while sound quality was good, my work colleagues couldn’t hear me talking. Maybe it was a glitch, maybe I had inadvertently muted the microphone (flipping it up will mute the sound) but I wouldn’t use this headset for non-gaming endeavours.

JBL claims that the 600s have a 14 hours music playtime with the RGB lighting off before needing a recharge and while I didn’t log my usage minute by minute, I reckon I got at least eight hours – with the RGB lighting on (despite not actually benefiting from seeing them being on) – before needing a recharge.

Bottom line is JBL have another winner on its hands here with the Quantum 600 wireless gaming headset, which will set you back around $250 which seems a reasonable for a headset of this build and sound quality.

Your ears will love you for it.

 

Edifer V4 gaming headset review: Two thumbs up

The LEDs surrounding the V4 ear cups give Edifer’s gaming headset a nice look.

I reviewed Edifer’s G4 over-ear gaming headset last year so was keen to look at the company’s V4 gaming headset when I was offered the chance but just how do the two headsets differ?

To be honest, I’m not sure, as they both seem pretty similar in terms of specifications and design.

Like the G4s, the V4s are comfortable to wear, with the faux leather padded ear cups cushioning your ears. I wore them for extended gaming periods and didn’t experience any discomfort or soreness and they didn’t feel heavy on my head. The V4s also did a good job of blocking out exterior noise – perhaps not as good as my Sol Republic headset – but enough to quieten down exterior TV noise or conversations.

The V4s have a faux leather material that means the ear cups are comfortable.

The V4s are PC, PS4 and Mac compatible and each ear cup has a 40mm driver unit (as well as in-built LED lighting in the mesh metal interior), offering a frequency response of 20Hz – 20KHz (I have no idea what that means) and an impedence of 20ohm (again, I have no idea what that means).

The headset connects via USB and the 2.5m-long cable is enough to let you plug it into a games console in a TV entertainment unit and let you sit on a couch. The cable has an in-line remote built in which turns the headset on and off and mutes the retractable boom microphone (which sits in the left ear cup). I tested the headset on my PC, playing Respawn’s excellent Titanfall2 and on PS4, playing Rockstar’s also excellent Red Dead Redemption 2. Audio was clear and crisp, with nice bass tones in both games.

The V4s also have positional 7.1 surround sound built in, which means you can hear everything that’s happening, and vibration, activated with a toggle on the inline remote control. The vibration isn’t over-the-top and just a slight enhancement of the game audio. It’s nice that you can toggle it on and off, meaning if you don’t want the vibration, you can switch it off.

The retractable boom mic & inline remote control.

The headset band is quite flexible, seeming pretty robust (although, I wouldn’t get too carried away twisting it) and it’s well priced, clocking in at just under $NZ100.

Overall, Edifer’s V4 gaming headset offers a great gaming headset that’s comfortable, provides good in-game audio, and, importantly, won’t break the bank if your looking for a good entry level gaming headset.

I’m still  not sure what the difference between the G4 and V4 headset is but with a great price and great performance, Edifer’s V4 gaming headset seems like it’s two-thumbs up worthy.

Thanks to PR company King Creative Media for the review unit.

Edifier G4 gaming headset review: You can hear a pin drop

Sometimes, in the heat of battle, knowing where an opponent is can mean the difference between life and death. The difference between victory and defeat.

When you’re gaming and don’t want to upset your partner, a good set of gaming headphones can be worth their weight in loot crates/prize chests/gold/virtual currency, and give that extra advantage, letting you hearing approaching footprints from behind or that crucial moment when an enemy reloads a weapon. Let me introduce the Edifier G4 gaming headset.

The control box.

The retractable boom microphone.

The G4’s cable, at 2.5m in length and plugs in via USB (so, no, you can’t use these on your smartphone), was long enough to plug into my console in the entertainment unit and I could still sit on the couch and play Shadow of the Colossus & Monster Hunter World. The on-cable control box is a little bulky but doesn’t get in the way, which is good. The retractable boom mic cleverly disappears into the left ear cup, which means if you don’t need to use it, you don’t have to worry about smacking your face with it (it also has an illuminated LED at the tip, which is a small but nice touch).

The ear cups have plenty of foam to cushion your ears.

My review G4’s were bright green and black in colour, and the ear cups illuminated a brilliant green when they were turned on. The ear cups are big and roomy with a good amount of padding so should accommodate any size of ear and the exterior of the ear cup has a mesh grill, covering the 40mm neodymium driver. They look super smart.

While sleek, the black plastic is a bit of a fingerprint magnet.

Aimed at the budget gamer, The G4s are a mix of shiny and flat plastics and I noticed that the shiny plastic that made up the body of the headphones was something of a fingerprint magnet: Keep a soft cloth handy if smudges annoy you! The headset felt comfortable on my head and the ear cups cushioned my ears nicely.

There’s software that you can download to tweak sound settings but it seemed overly complicated, to be honest, so I didn’t rely on it much.

OK, so how did the G4s sound, though? It’s not bad. Not bad at all.

The G4’s have a built-in sound card virtual 7.1 channel audio and have really good high and mid range notes and even to my old man ears, the sound was great, with ambient noises and sounds popping thanks to the G4s.

Game soundtracks and ambient effects sounded clear and crisp, although I thought at times the G4 lacked a really deep, thumping bass but then, to confuse things, it depending on what game I was playing. In Shadow of the Colossus, for example, when a colossi was defeated and tumbled to the ground, the bass vibrated nicely as it hit the ground.

And the price? This is probably the really surprising thing about the G4s. You can pick them up in NZ for around $120 (I saw one site selling them for $109). That’s multiple dollars less than my much-loved Sol Republic bluetooth headphones that my children bought me for my birthday a couple of years ago, and my son reckons the G4’s delivered better sound, too. I think I agree with him.

For a budget priced gaming headset, I was impressed with Edifier’s G4s. They do the job, look the part, and, importantly if you’re budget conscious, they won’t break the bank.