JBL Quantum 800 review

JBL’s Quantum series of gaming headsets have been out for a while now: I reviewed the Quantum 600s on the site last year, saying my “ears were in aural heaven” but now, I’m taking a look at JBL’s Quantum 800s, a more feature-packed wireless headset and it’s second from the top in its gaming headset range.

I use the Quantum 600s as my daily gaming headset and despite the two being essentially identical in design and build, the 800s just seems more premium with a more comfortably fit. I’m not sure whether it was mind playing tricks on me but the ear cups on the 800 felt more comfortable than those on the 600s, with the leather-covered memory foam feeling a lot more dense and more secure over my ears. The headphones withstood a bit of twisting and didn’t seem to move around much on my head when I moved it from side to side.

The left ear cup houses a flexible, fold down boom mic, a mic mute button, a volume wheel, a game/chat balance wheel, a 3.5mm input and a USB-c charge port. The left ear cup also sports a a button that activates the active noise cancelling functionality. The right ear cup is home to the power/pairing button and the Bluetooth connection button.

The Quantum 800s support surround sound options DTS and JBL’s own Quantum surround sound which gives you 7.1 audio right into your ears. It also has Bluetooth 5.0 connectivity meaning you can connect your phone or another mobile device to the headset so you can still hear listen to music or hear incoming phone calls when you’re gaming. You can also use them with a console like a Nintendo Switch using the 3.5mm cable.

Speaking of the cables, it’s a small thing but the USB-c charge cable and 3.5mm cable are a nice braided cable with alternating orange and black highlights rather than straight black plastic. It’s just a small thing but shows JBL want the whole package to be a high-end one.

Like the 600s, the 800s connect via a USB transmitter and JBL’s QuantumEngine PC software lets you tweak things like in-built sound presets (clarity, deeper bass, boost high end tones or FPS specific soundscape), surround sound settings and the ear cups’ RGB lighting. I switched the lighting off as I’d rather have battery life than flashing lights, thanks. JBL promises around 14 hours with the lighting turned off and that seemed about right, although I didn’t record how much time I got between charges. Battery life is much less, of course, if you’re blasting the RGB 24/7.

The tagline for the Quantum series is “Sound is survival” so how do the Quantum 800s sound compared to the 600s which I use regularly? Much, much better, if I’m honest. I felt that the 800s delivered slightly better sound than the Quantum 600s, delivering impressive deep bass and nice, crisp highs. I tested the 800s playing games like God of War on PS5 – you can use them with consoles using the USB dongle but will need to use the 3.5mm cable on an Xbox One X console – and really noticed that the headset was able to deliver immersive and impressive sound while I was gaming.


Perhaps the biggest advantage the 800s have over the 600s is the Active Noise Cancelling (ANC) functionality, which is activated by the button on the left ear cup.

A robotic voice lets you know when ANC is on or off and believe me, you can actually hear the difference when it’s active: It drowned out the reality TV playing in the next room and let me concentrate on what I was doing on my PC: Playing games. Sure, JBL’s ANC isn’t as good as on my Bose QuietComfort 35iis but for a gaming headset, it’s an excellent feature to have when you just want to concentrate on the mission and drown out external noise.

JBL is really aiming high with its Quantum range of gaming headsets and for me, a good gaming headset must do two things: Deliver great sound when I’m gaming and be comfortable. JBL’s Quantum 800 headset delivers on both counts. Two thumbs up from me.

Thanks to JBL for the review unit. The Quantum 800s will retail for around $NZ400.

JBL Quantum 300 gaming headset review: My ears are happy

Despite years and years and years of playing video games, one thing I don’t own is a good gaming headset.

Oh, sure, I’ve got a stellar pair of Bose Comfort 35s [probably the best headphones I’ve ever owned] but they don’t have a boom microphone so they’re not ideal if I decide to go online and get my arse kicked by people much younger than I am.

Step up JBL’s Quantum gaming headset range, which Quantum’s NZ PR kindly sent me to try out – and try out I did, on a variety of games.

Quantum game me a number to choose from but I decided to pick the Quantum 300s, a mid-range set of wired gaming headphones, and right off the bat, these things are comfy. Extremely comfy, thanks to memory foam ear cups. Sometimes I get hot ears when I wear over-ear headphones for too long but the Quantum 300s didn’t cause me that problem.

The Quantum 300s connect to your PC via a USB connection which in turn joins to a 3.5mm miniplug – which means you can also connect the 300s to any other gaming device, be it a Nintendo Switch, a PlayStation Dualshock 4 controller or an Xbox One controller. The left ear cup has a raised volume dial which is easy to reach mid-game.

They’ve got 50mm drivers, the aforementioned memory foam on the headband, and a flip up/down directional microphone with a nice foam shield and has a nice “ting” sound when you flip it up and down. And they’re comfy. Did I mention they were comfy?

I’m also a stickler for small touches on products and the the Quantum 300s have a nice braided cable, which, even if it’s just for aesthetics, looks so much better than bland plastic-coated cable – and to make sure you put the right ear cup on the right ear (we don’t want any audio imbalance now, do we? the right cup has a bright orange R printed on the inside and the left cup has a bright orange L printed on the inside. They tip the scales at 245 grams.

Quantum says the range is optimised for PC, and it shows, with management software¬† – the JBL QuantumEngine – that lets you tweak the sound balance, which ranges from boosting the bass levels to emphasising higher tones so the top end is crisper), to microphone sensitivity and whether you want stereo or JBL’s Quantum 7.1 audio (which sounds damn amazing). There’s even advanced features which let you enter your head circumference and body height so things are just right.

But how was the sound? Bloody impressive, I must say.

Bass notes were deep and booming and high notes were crisp and clear – and the impact from these things was just as impressive whether I was using the spatial surround sound while gaming on my PC or playing The Bioshock Collection on Nintendo Switch or Uncharted 4 on the PS4.

My ears were in audio heaven with the aural goodness being fired into them from these JBL earcans.

The Quantum 300s will set you back around $NZ150 which I think is excellent value, given the build quality quality and impressive sound. Well worth it, in my book.

If you’re looking for a reasonably priced gaming headset, I’d recommend these beauties from JBL wholeheartedly.