Oppo A91 smartphone review

Let’s cut right to the chase: I was left impressed by Oppo’s mid-range A91 handset which screams high-end design and features but comes with a more wallet friendly price.

I say it’s mid-range because priced at $649 it’s not a cheap handset that you’d treat roughly and toss to the curb when you’re done. The A91 is much better than that.

In your hand, the A91 feels solid yet not cumbersome (it tips the scales at 172gms and 7.9mm thick) and right out of the box, it looks like a premium smartphone thanks to the reflective blue back plate.

Even when it’s snug within the provided clear silcone cover, the phone feels comfortable when you’re holding it (and the benefit of a clear protective case means you get to see the gorgeous colour which Oppo has name Blazing Blue. It also comes in Lightening Black).

Sporting a 6.4-inch full HD AMOLED screen (with a resolution of 2400 x 1080), colours are vibrant and images pop on the A91’s display, and a nice feature at this price point is the under screen fingerprint reader, which unlocks the device blazingly fast. It’s a nice touch on a phone at this price point.

It also has facial recognition which worked most of the time but I found the fingerprint so accurate that I tended to rely on that most times.

The A91’s rear camera setup.

The A91 has all the connectivity options you’d expect on a smartphone (WiFi, Bluetooth) and one that I wasn’t expecting at this price point (NFC). Couple that with 128Gb of expandable storage (up to 256Gb via microSD),  8Gb of memory and a 4025mAh battery, the A91 packs a lot of punch for  not a lot of money.

I got roughly a full day and a bit before requiring a charge and that was super quick, thanks to Oppo’s VOOC 3.0 fast charging option. The A91supports dual SIMs, which means you can have both your work SIM and personal SIM in the one device. I didn’t use that option but it’s a good feature for those of you who would rather just have one phone for both work and home rather than carry two around all the time. For the time I had the phone, it was the phone that used every day and I enjoyed my time with it.

Sounds good, right?

Well, it gets better with a quad camera set up which offers a 48MP main lens, an 8MP ultrawide lens, a 2MP lens and a 2MP depth sensor. I was impressed with the photographic capabilities of the A91, too, some of my efforts which you can see here (including the obligatory cute dog shot). There’s also a 16MP front facing camera for those of you who love to take numerous self portraits, if you’re that way inclined, of course.

Whenever I get a new phone to review, I always take lots of photos with it and it was no different with the A91: I took photos around the house, I took photos of the dog, I took photos of sunsets. Lots and lots of photos of sunsets and the A91 delivered solid results every time

The A91 uses AI to determine what’s in your photo then sets things up for you ie animal, sunset, fruit: It’s no muss, no fuss photography. It features Electronic Image Stablisation and a built-in gyroscope so videos are smooth and non-shaky, and it features an impressive ultra night mode, which does an excellent job of adjusting night time photos so you get the best out of what you’re taking photos of at night or in low-light situation.

Frankly, I was impressed immensely with the A91 and in this age of expensive smartphones, it’s a handset that ticks all the boxes for a well-rounded Android smartphone that won’t break the bank.

I can’t recommend the A91 highly enough.

Thanks to Oppo New Zealand for the review unit.

Oppo A9 2020 review

To say I’ve been impressed with Oppo handsets is an understatement.

I’ve reviewed a few Oppo handsets over the past few years: The budget-focused AX7, the more pricey Reno 10x zoom and the R17 Pro and all three have impressed the hell out of me with their mix of smart design and great performance.

This time around, I’m looking at an Oppo at the other end of the scale: The mid-range A9 2020, which retails for around $500, and frankly, it’s a cracker.

Running ColorOS 6.0 (Oppo’s UI software layered over the base Android 9.0 OS), the A9 2020 sports a 6.5-inch OLED screen and is powered by a quad-core Snapdragon 665 CPU. A 5000mAh battery will give you a days worth of use before needing a charge, 8Gb of RAM, 128Gb of storage (expandable to 256Gb via MicroSD), and stereo speakers with Dolby Atmos round out the package. Surprisingly, it also allows for a dual SIM setup, handy if you want to combine a work phone and personal phone into one handset.

It also has a four-camera setup: a 48 megapixel main camera, an 8MP ultra-wide lens (119 degrees), a 2MP mono lens and a 2MP portrait lens. More about the camera later, though.

Like the more expensive Reno 10x zoom, the A9 has a nice heft to it and feels weighty in the hand when you pick it up. Despite being a budget phone, a fingerprint scanner just under the three main camera lenses allows for fast unlocking, as does the facial recognition which allows you to unlock the handset just by looking at it.

The A9 2020 sports a 1600×720 resolution screen and is vivid, bright and responsive. Sure it’s not the more common-these-days 1080p resolution, but for my money, on a 6.5-inch smartphone screen, the difference is inperceptible to my old eyes, anyway.

Turn the Oppo over and you’ll notice the array of camera lenses cascading down from the central top of the phone. I used the A9’s camera in a variety of situations.

Here’s a selection of photos taken with the Oppo’s camera.

Outdoor photos seemed natural with clear, crisp images but images captured using the night mode were quite grainy. The A9’s camera’s strength is definitely daylight photos.

Keen to test out the phone’s gaming prowess, I tested it on 3D Mark’s Sling Shot Extreme benchmark (Open GL ES 3.1 & Vulkan APIs), returning scores of 1089 and 1057 (placing it 1% better than Huawai’s Mate 10 Pro).

One feature that Oppo promotes is the Game Boost 2.0 software, which supposedly optimises the phone for when you play games: blocking notifications and phone calls so you get an uninterrupted gaming experience. I tested the A9 2020 with Deus Ex Go, a rather superb mobile game based on SquareEnix’s Deus Ex series, and Gameloft’s Asphalt 9: Legends, a racing game that would push the phone to its limits. I also selected the software’s competitive mode setting (which is said to improve performance and frame rates but will use more power).

In Asphalt 9, the Oppo seemed to perform pretty well and I didn’t notice any perceptible lag. I also tested the A9 202 with the Antutu benchmarking suite which stress tests phone hardware using a variety of tests. The Oppo returned a score of 171,239, telling me the phone “defeated 12% of users” [I wasn’t really sure what that meant, to be honest, as it didn’t provide details of what users it had defeated].

Oppo is a handset manufacturer that continues to astound and impress me with its smartphone offerings and it’s done it again with the A9 2020, a mid-range smart phone that packs high-end features but has a low end price.

If you’re in the market for a good price mid-range phone, you should definitely consider the A9 2020 in the mix.

Oppo AX7 smartphone review

For as budget priced, mid-range phone, Oppo really has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the AX7.

It really doesn’t look – or feel – like a budget smart phone.

Clad in a colour that Oppo describes as glaze blue, the AX7 feels comfortable in the hand, with a nice weight to it, and the attention to detail in the small – but noticeable – details like the camera lens surround means Oppo’s latest phone will get noticed.

Powered by a Snapdragon 450 octa-core CPU, the AX7 comes with a 6.2-inch HD+ display, 4Gb of RAM and is running Oppo’s ColorOS 5.2 (based on Android 8.2) but weirdly, just 64Gb of internal storage space, which in this day and age of digital consumption doesn’t really cut the mustard these days. Thankfully, the storage can be expanded via microSD card (upto 256Gb). A nice touch is the SIM card tray has space for two SIMs, meaning you can use the phone as your work mobile and private number.

The AX7 comes with all the latest bells and whistles you’d expect, including a fingerprint scanner. If I had one gripe about the scanner it would be that I thought it was perhaps positioned a little too high and could be a tad deeper, so that it’s easy to find first time. That said, it’s fast enough when it comes to unlocking the handset.

I was pleasantly surprised with the phone’s battery life, with the 4230mAh battery lasting a good couple of days with moderate use (phone calls, texting, browsing, the odd YouTube video). I’m still not sold on Oppo’s ColorOS operating system, which can be a little slow at times.

Perhaps the star of the AX7, though, is the camera, which sports 13MP and 2MP sensors at the back and a 16MP sensor at the front. It’s a selfie star, according to Oppo, although I’m not big on selfies, to be honest. Sure the customisation options for the camera are limited when compared to more expensive phones but it’s a good, honest shooter that will do what it says on the tin.

Photos taken with the AX7 were clear and sharp, with bright colours and details, although I thought sometimes the images were a little over saturated at times.

Perhaps the best thing about the AX7, though, is the price. Oppo has set the RRP at $399, which means it’s within reach for average consumers. I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: Not everyone needs a $1000-plus smart phone (realistically, does anyone, really?) and like Huawei with its budget-priced Nova 3i, Oppo have created a nice-looking, well-performing smart phone that does everything you need without requiring you to mortgage the house, give up a kidney or sell your first-born.

Look, the AX7 isn’t going to compete in terms of lightning fast performance of higher end smartphones and with Oppo’s own rather great R17 Pro, but then, it’s not designed to. It offers great value for money with a battery that will go the distance (I’m still not 100% sold on ColorOS, though).

What’s not to like?

A big thanks to Oppo NZ for providing the AX7 for review.