Possession 1881: A creepy point-and-click adventure

Sometimes its the intriguing emails that capture your attention the most.

Danielle Lemky, who runs Canadian indie game maker End of Line Studios, emailed me the other day after stumbling across an article I did about adventure games when I was still employed as a journalist with Fairfax NZ/Stuff way back in 2013.

Her email started: “Hello GameJunkienz (Or should I say Old Man Gamer?)!” I wasn’t sure whether to be miffed being labelled an Old Man Gamer, which to be fair I probably am, or impressed. Either way, I was intrigued enough to write about the Lemky’s first game Possession 1881 so points to Danielle and Jared for getting in touch.

Here’s what they told me about the game, which is described as an occult-themed point-and-click adventure: “Possession 1881 is a classic adventure game, and as such, players must find clues and see connections between objects to solve puzzles, which will allow players to progress through rooms within an old Victorian mansion.

“Clues can be found in many places such as in notes, in books, on walls, on objects, or even within the animations of objects.  The clues and the rooms of the mansion include facts from history, archaeology, music, science, and the occult within the Victorian Era, and allow the player to immerse themselves in that time period and environment.

“The environment is dark and beautiful with soaring skylights, moonlight, rich wooden Victorian decorations, flickering candlelight, and carefully crafted sound effects and music.”

Jared tells me that the game leans more towards the suspense and creepy side of the fence rather than horror. “No monsters, no jump scares, just a creepy abandoned mansion with puzzles to solve and a morbid story. We were inspired by Myst, The Room  and our own fascination with logic puzzles,” he says.

I’m not sure it’s my cup of tea – games with scary themes tend to freak me out a little – but if it’s your thing, Possession 1881 might be worth keeping an eye on. It’s due out on June 5 through Steam.

“I feel like I could … take on the world!”

Update: After I wrote this yesterday, a member of the Facebook group I’m a member of A Streak of Geek posted it, talking about his love for the old Lucasarts games. Reading it made me realise that I’ve also played Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, The Dig, Loom and Ron Gilbert’s The Cave. How could I forget that I played those. Thanks Peter from A Streak of Geek for reminding me!)

For some strange reason, I never played the original Day of the Tentacle.

Day of the Tentacle Remastered_20160330194408I say strange because I played some of Lucasart’s other great point-and-click adventure games: Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, The Secret of Monkey Island (I still own disc copies of Grim and Full Throttle)  but DOTT passed me by. I’m not sure why that was but I’m making up for that now, thanks to Double Fine’s remastered DOTT on PlayStation 4, PC, PS Vita and Mac.

I pre-ordered the game on PS4 ($23, I think) solely so I could download it onto my PS Vita as well – and the point-and-click game play is perfectly suited to the smaller form factor of Sony’s handheld, and while some of the text might be a little harder to read with my ageing eyes than on a 55-inch TV, Day of the Tentacle just feels right on the Vita.

DOTT has players control the three main characters – Bernard, Laverne and Hoagie – as they attempt to stop Purple Tentacle who drank some toxic sludge behind the mansion of Dr Fred Edison. The game involves different time periods and the solving of puzzles to try to thwart Purple Tentacle.

 

Players interact with items in the gameworld using actions such as “use”,  “pick up”, “open” in an attempt to solve the game’s puzzles.

Like other remastered Lucasart’s games, you can either play it in the new remastered graphic style, which looks really nice,  or – at the touch of a button on the Vita and a press of the touch pad on the PS4 controller – it reverts to the game’s pixellated art style. I found myself flicking back and forth between the two styles, but it really shows how much work Double Fine put into modernising the game’s visuals.

Here’s some video from the PS4 version (no spoilers, I don’t think). The first one shows Bernard in the game’s opening moments exploring Dr Edison’s mansion  while the other shows Hoagie exploring the time period he finds himself trapped in after one of Dr Edison’s Chrono-johns malfunctions

Some of the puzzles are stumping me but I can see me spending a lot of time with Day of the Tentacle Remastered, and that’s a good thing.