Ghost of Tsushima review: Way of the samurai

Tsushima is an island situated between the Tsushima Strait and the Korea Strait, approximately half way between the Japanese mainland and the Korean peninsula.

According to Japanese mythology, Tsushima was one of the eight original islands created by the Shinto deities Izanagi and Izanami and its two islands have a long history and was  an important trading post during feudal Japan, which was invaded by the Mongols between 1274 and 1281.

In 1274, the first Mongol invasion of Tsushima killed a great number of the island’s inhabitants and it’s with this historic backdrop that development studio Sucker Punch has set its latest creation Ghost of Tsushima – and I rather liked it [That’s the short version but I’d be rather thankful if you stuck around to the end as it took me a while to get these words just how I wanted them].

Sucker Punch has a long and illustrious history with PlayStation 4 and it kicked off its PlayStation 4 relationship with the rather excellent inFamous Second Son and now as we near the end of a console generation it ends it with PlayStation 4 exclusive Ghost of Tsushima, first announced way back in 2015.

The game opens with the Mongol invasion of Tsushima and Jin Sakai is one of the last remaining samurai, left for dead and his uncle Lord Shimura  captured, presumed dead. Leading the Mongols is Khotun Khan, the nephew of Ghengis Khan, and a brutal, well-studied enemy who offers the people of Tsushima a bleak future: Bow to him or they will die.

Jin is found and nursed back to health and he vows to rally the splintered factions across Tsushima to his join his cause, defeat the Khan and reclaim Tsushima.

As a highly trained samurai, throughout the game Jin constantly battles internal demons as he tries to reconcile what it means to be a samurai while being forced to evolve his tactics to face a new, more brutal enemy, something unlike the Japanese had seen before.

As a child being trained by his uncle, Jin was taught the ways of the samurai: “Loyalty to our lord, control of our emotions, fight bravely, and honour the legacy of clan Sakai.” As his legend grows, Jin must decide does he kill stealthily to become the Ghost or challenge foes face-to-face as is the way of the samurai?

I played Ghost of Tsushima from start to finish with how I personally feel is the most appropriate way the game should be played: With the Japanese language track and English subtitles. It just didn’t feel right to me to play a game set in feudal Japan and featuring samurai in any other way, at least not in my first play through.

Central to combat is something called resolve, which is earned by killing enemies, parrying attacks and completing tasks. Resolve can be used to activate special attacks, as well as used to replenish your health when it falls dangerously low.

Completing story quests earns Jin technique points which can be used to upgrade his stances and combat tactics, allowing him to be a stronger fighter, or unlock throwable weapons such as kunai (knives), sticky bombs (which sticks to an enemy before exploding) or wind chimes (which can be used to distract an enemy).

Sucker Punch has made a point of mentioning that GOT doesn’t have an on-screen pointer to tell you where your objective is – and they’re right: Apart from a small line of text in the top left corner showing the current objective title and how far you are from your destination is, the screen is devoid of any other elements.  It is a minimalist’s dream and a recent patch brought an even more sparse UI (recommended for “expert players”, apparently).

So if there’s no on-screen objective marker, how the heck do you know where to go? By following the wind, my friend, by following the wind. If you swipe up on the Dualshock 4’s touchpad,  gusts of wind blow in the direction you need to go. It’s effective and is frankly refreshing to find a game that is using the technique.GOT is very much a game where you look for visual cues to tell you something is nearby or where you’re going: Tori gates point you to cliff top shrines that grant you charms that help in defensive and offensive moves; yellow birds flying to hot springs where you can soak to recover health or religious monuments; foxes lead you to inari shrines.

Visual cues also play an important part in combat: From the yells of Mongol archers which indicate they are about to unleash arrows on your to the red glint of an enemies weapon, meaning an unblockable attack is coming and you need to roll out of the way.

Then there are the standoffs where Jin challenges opponents to lethal one-on-one face offs. Press, hold and release the triangle button just as the enemy strikes and Jin will kill the enemy with once slice of his razor-sharp katana. A downed fow will stagger forward briefly, grasping his neck, blood spurting from the wound, before crumpling to the ground, a lifeless body.

By the mid-point of the game, I had maxed out Jin’s standoff ability, enabling him to take down three enemies in quick succession during a standoff encounter  (if I didn’t screw it up, of course), each strike captured in glorious slow motion.

There has been talk online by many that the combat looks Sekiro like: It’s nothing like Sekiro a game I downright hated and gave up on. GOT is all about learning attack patterns, parrying blows and striking hard and fast.

Make no mistake, though, the combat can be brutally unforgiving, especially if you get surrounded by a group consisting of the game’s four main enemy types: Sword wielders, shield carriers, spear bearers and big dudes [but I just call them tanks because that’s what they are] and crucial to defeating them all is mastering the four “stances”: Wind, stone, water and moon, each more suited to a particular enemy.  You’ll find yourself switching between stances on the fly as you tackle all the Mongels have to offer.

I mastered the combat but even late in the game I was still getting my arse handed to me on a plate sometimes when I managed to get surrounded by too many heavy enemies or I screwed up a stand off. If I have one piece of advice it’s this: Use the right stance against the right enemy and max them all out as soon as possible.

As Jin becomes more powerful and his legend grows, he gains the power to terrify nearby enemies through the sheer brutality of some of his attacks and frightened foes will run off, too scared to face you. Assassinations are brutal, too, with sprays of claret erupting from the chests or necks of hapless Mongels.

I have to talk about the side quests because they’re incredibly well written and varied but, importantly, feel a natural extension of the main narrative and not just tacked on to pad the story out. It might be a woman barricaded up in a remote wooden cottage who requires medicinal herbs that mongols at a nearby camp stole from her or a quest to find a mysterious vengeful spirit that rewards you with a mystical power that comes incredibly handy in combat against some of Mongol’s more formidable warlords.

There is so much to discover and much of the time you’ll just stumble across things, be it side quests or points of interest.

Ghost of Tsushima starts off slow, perhaps too slow for my liking, with Act one rather pedestrian at times and I did wonder at one point “Does it get better than this?”. It does and once you start upgrading Jin’s abilities the game opes up dramatically, combat is more free-flowing and the narrative gallops ahead.

For all that is excellent with Ghost of Tsushima, it is still lumbered with the odd tired old gaming tropes from time to time, like instant fail stealth sections if you’re spotted by an enemy and a “Follow this person of interest for a bit to see where they go but don’t get spotted” mission. Thankfully, that one didn’t last long but I had flashbacks to the Assassin’s Creed games I’ve played with its stealth mechanic.

I also encountered the odd “Return to the tale zone” messages (complete with a countdown timer) after I’d apparently stepped outside the prescribed area for an active tale. Aren’t we past this type of mechanic this late in the current generation? Here’s hoping the new generation will see an end of those tired cliched tropes.

Animation is generally top notch, especially in combat, but from time to time you’ll notice Jin’s feet not quite sitting right as he wanders about and climbing is not as smooth as I’d hoped for.

Visually, Ghost of Tsushima is stunning, which you’ll hopefully see in the screen shots peppered throughout this review  – and it gets more stunning as you move through the game world. It’s particularly nice to see that in an industry where many of its products are so often dominated by browns and greys, Ghost of Tsushima is a burst of vibrant freshness, with the island of Tsushima bursting with explosions of colour: Golden yellows, vibrant purples, bright reds and greens, piercing blues and glowing orange.

There has been much talk about the Kurasawa mode which pays homage to the movies of Japanese director Akira Kurasawa and it’s a nice touch, with the black and white image featuring film grain and more dramatic camera angles, but, personally, I couldn’t play the game from start to finish like that. I switched to the mode for a few minutes to see what it was all about then reverted back to the normal mode.

 

For those video game photographers, GOT also has got you covered, with a great photo mode. I found myself pausing the game and framing photos far too often: Before too long I’d captured 3.7Gb of images and video, some I can show here, others I can’t until after the game is out in the wild, so to speak. It’s an amazingly comprehensive photo mode, too, with a huge number of tweakable options including a black and white mode, the ability to determine the amount of on-screen details and a day-night cycle.

By the time the credits rolled on the main story, I had found 12 of 49 fox dens (yes, you can pet the foxes), gained two of the four mystic powers, soaked in six of the eight hot pools, visited six of the 16 Shinto shrines (all atop rocky peaks) and visited three of the eight lighthouses. My goal is to find everything this game has to offer, no matter how long it takes, and I reckon I’ve already sunk more than 35+ hours into it (an hour counter would be really helpful), with my play time including at least two six hour sessions. I plan to take my time and discover al the hidden locations and mop up the remaining Mongol stragglers.

The bottom line is I enjoyed Ghost of Tsushima immensely and while it doesn’t fundamentally do anything radically different from all the other open-world games out there, I enjoyed the narrative and its characters.

If you plan to play it, I have this advice: Don’t rush it. Take your time, explore the world, soak in the atmosphere, discover what lies behind that hills, over that rise, behind that stand of trees. Take. Your. Time.

With Ghost of Tsushima, Sucker Punch has delivered a wonderful closing chapter that not only fittingly celebrates the Japanese samurai but is a fitting farewell to this Sony console generation.

*Thanks to PlayStation New Zealand for the advance copy of Ghost of Tsushima. I completed the main campaign on a PlayStation Pro.

Win with Pricespy & GamejunkieNZ

Good evening.

I originally planned to run this competition a week ago but, yeah, life got in the way ….

New Zealand has just moved into alert level 1 so to celebrate that monumental event, we’ve teamed up with PriceSpy to offer one reader the chance to win two games from Pricespy’s top five most searched for video games in April.

Liisa Matinvesi-Bassett, New Zealand country manager for PriceSpy, says even though Kiwis were unable to buy games during lockdown, it didn’t deter them from clicking on some of the latest new releases.

“For example, Final Fantasy VII – Remake for PlayStation 4 and Animal Crossing: New Horizons for Nintendo Switch were found to be the most popular games shoppers clicked on during April.

“Animal Crossing: New Horizons in particular has performed exponentially for Nintendo around the globe. Even faced against the COVID-19 pandemic, Nintendo reportedly sold 13.41million copies worldwide over the first six weeks of release, with many retailers selling out completely.”

PriceSpy found that in New Zealand, Animal Crossing: New Horizons still proved to be extremely popular however it was Final Fantasy VII – Remake that pipped it to the post in April, claiming overall top position.”

How to enter: To be in to win two games from Pricespy’s top five most searched games for April, send me an email at gamejunkienz@gmail.com, telling me what game you’re most looking forward to this year.

The competition is only open to New Zealand residents and the winner will be drawn (by me) sometime on Tuesday, June 16. I will then forward the winner’s email to Pricespy which will forward the games to the winner. Simple.

Cloudpunk: Blade Runner meets The Fifth Element

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I’ve just finished Ionland’s Blade Runner-inspired game Cloudpunk, where you play a new delivery driver in a neon-lit, rain-soaked city populated by humans and androids –  and colour me impressed.

I’ll write a review soon, when I’ve got my thoughts in order, but this post is really just to give you an insight into the absolutely stunning visuals of Cloudpunk, a game that really does look like the love child of the iconic movie Blade Runner (and, conversely, Westworld’s Blade Runner game) – with its neon-punctuated environments – and Luc Besson’s utterly brilliant movie The Fifth Element, where chaotic hover cars ply the congested skies as citizens move from point A to point B.

During my 16-hour play through of Cloudpunk, I just couldn’t help myself and stop to take screen shots and videos every few minutes, just to capture how gorgeous the game world is. I loved the game’s narrative and its storytelling (although it’s not perfect).

So until my review drops, soak in the visual splendor of the neon-dripping world of Cloudpunk.

 

Games a popular search prior to lockdown, according to Pricespy

As we enter another week of Level 4 lock down, price aggregation site Pricespy has been in touch, telling me that it found quite a few New Zealanders searched for new games to keep themselves entertained before we went into lock down.

Liisa Matinvesi-Bassett, New Zealand country manager for PriceSpy, says:  “In March alone, the number of clicks received across the entire shopping category of ‘games and consoles’ skyrocketed, increasing by almost a third (+30 per cent), which is extremely high.

“Interestingly, the number of clicks received started to rise from the 18th March before peaking on the 24th, ahead of the national stage four lock down that started on the 26th.”

In terms of the most popular games people were clicking on, the data also found between the 18th and 26th March, the most popular games based on historical click data from PriceSpy that people searched for were:

  • Animal Crossing New Horizons (Nintendo Switch)
  • Fifa 20 (PlayStation 4)
  • Call of Duty Modern Warfare (PS4)
  • The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild (Switch)
  • NBA 2K20 (PS4)

Matinvesi-Bassett says looking at the historical pricing data across the top five most clicked-on games, even though the country is still on a stage four national lock down, 80 per cent of the games were found to have spiked on the 31st March compared to the 24th March.

So, did you pick up any games before lock down? If so, what did you get & if not, what are you playing through the lock down?

 

Control: A trip down the slightly unnerving

Control has a pretty good photo mode, too.

I don’t tend to get on with games that touch upon supernatural themes so maybe that’s why I’ve only just picked up Remedy’s Control now, several months after it came out and many awards later.

My reason for picking it up now was initially purely financial: It was on sale on PSN a couple of weeks before Easter for $NZ41 so I thought “For that price, why the feck not?” I mean, I’d heard good things about it and if I hated it, I’d only dropped $40.  The game had also been recommended to me by gamer friends.

Now, I’m only about a handful of hours in, but as I made my way deeper and deeper through the Oldest House, uncovering the secrets of the Federal Bureau of Control, I realised I wasn’t quite prepared for the overarching feeling of unease I felt as I played the game.

I don’t mean unease in the sense that the subject matter was difficult to stomach, but in the sense that at lot of what was going on around me was, to be honest, just unnerving (for those of you who have played it, when communications director Tomassi first turned up I just uttered a stunned: “What the fuck is that?”).

Unnerving in the sense that I was never quite sure what was waiting for me around the next corner, friendly or not, as I gingerly wandered through corridors with warped architecture and rooms with people floating just below the ceiling.

Control is a whole lot of unnerving – and this is from someone who has played the Alan Wake games that just freaked the fuck out of me.

Now, I wouldn’t call Control a horror game like, say, Resident Evil where gruesome horror is to the fore. I’ve played the Alan Wake games and they freaked me out due to the sheer horror element but Alan Wake’s horror theme was to the fore: With control there’s an underlying supernatural theme with just bat shit crazy stuff happening all around you.

Game play is where Control shines, although it slowly introduces abilities through a mechanic called Objects of Power, relics that when controlled offer supremely useful abilities that turn the tide in the player’s favour. Telekinesis, or launch, is one such ability.

Telekinesis, for example, lets you pick up objects from the game world and launch them at foes, especially useful for larger enemies that have shields that need to be broken [it’s a similar principal that Remedy used in Alan Wake where Alan had to break the shield of ghostly entities using his flashlight first].

Let’s talk about the ability to launch just about anything at foes for a minute. It is a supremely strong ability and it is made all the better thanks to the game [almost completely] destructible environments which lets you pick up anything you can lay your hands on: Think chairs, think benches, think lamps, think masonry, think books, anything. Think of the game world as ammunition against the evil lurking in the Oldest House.

Movement is also a key to success in Control’s combat and at first, I played things safe, too safe, frequently standing on the spot as I fired upon advancing enemies. As a consequence I died a few times until I realised that, indeed, movement is the key to success here [There’s even a tip on a loading screen that says as much].

That said, I feel that so far Control’s gun play is actually weaker than the abilities side, especially given how powerful the telekinesis/launch power is. The guns you get are neat but I just felt that perhaps the weapon side was overshadowed dramatically by the powers/abilities.

I’ve always been a fan of Remedy’s games [Quantum Break was, probably, my least favourite] and Control is another one that has its claws dug deep into me and is my go-to game while we’re in lock down here [another week or so to go, at time of writing].

I’m sure the story is going to get freakier as I delve deeper into the Oldest House and uncover its secrets but so far, it’s one of the best games I’ve played in a long, long time.

Pokemon pips Jedi Knight for top spot in January game sales in NZ

It seems a Nintendo Switch game has pipped the PlayStation for top game in New Zealand for January, 2020, with Pokemon Sword pipping EA’s SW Jedi Fallen Order for the top spot last month.

Rounding out the top five were COD: Modern Warfare, NBA 2K20 and The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt – GOTY Edition (all on PS4).

Liisa Matinvesi-Bassett, New Zealand country manager for PriceSpy, says: “Based on our historical click data, even though four out of the five most popular games for January were found to be from PlayStation, the overall most popular game was Pokemon Sword for Nintendo Switch.

Pokemon Sword launched in November 2019 with an RRP of $99.  Normally, after two to three months after a game has launched, we would expect to see it drop significantly in price, so help it appear more competitively priced against other new releases and to encourage further sales to occur.

“However, according to our historical pricing insights, despite Pokemon Sword being almost three months old in January, the price point remained fairly static, dropping just 12 per cent compared to the RRP price at launch.

“The same cannot be said for the other top four games from PlayStation.  For example, even though Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order launched around the same time as Pokemon Sword, our historical pricing data in January revealed it dropped in price by almost 40 per cent (39 per cent) compared to its RRP at launch.

“Similarly the third most popular game in, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, also offered gamers a rather attractive 39 per cent off its original RRP in January.”

“Based on these findings, consumer demand for Pokemon Sword still remains to be fairly high, without the need for Nintendo to discount the product to entice consumers back in.  PlayStation on the other hand seem to be using a different tactic, offering gamers the opportunity to pick up a relatively new game at a bargain price a few months after release,” says Matinvesi-Bassett.

Observation review: “I’m sorry, Emma, I’m afraid I can’t do that” [PC]

It wouldn’t surprise me if the team behind sci-fi thriller Observation – were fans of movies Alien, Event Horizon and 2001 A Space Odyssey.

The game opens aboard the international space station Observation which is above Earth’s orbit after suffering a catastrophic event. The ship’s medical officer Dr Emma Fisher eventually manages to reboot the ship’s AI Sam [System Administration Maintenance] but Sam receives a strange transmission telling him to “BRING HER”. Fast forward a bit and after a second event, the Observation finds itself above Saturn, Sam’s core functions compromised and the rest of Observation’s crew missing. Emma tasks Sam with finding out what has happened.

Sam reminded me a lot of HAL 2000, the ship board AI from Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C Clarke’s 2001 A Space Odyssey [a movie from 1968  that most young gamers, sadly, will know nothing about]. In that movie, HAL 9000 is the sentient AI on a spaceship heading to Jupiter [there’s also a mysterious black monolith discovered by apes, but that’s a story for another day]. HAL turns rogue, responsible for uttering the chilling line “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that”.

Controlling Sam, you’re initially tasked by Fisher to assess any damage the ship has suffered, accessing the on board cameras to survey for problems. Sam opens hatches, when requested, provides feedback on ship-wide alerts and can possess remotely controlled drones which give a rather satisfying degree of movement around the ship’s tight confines.

Hints of Event Horizon started to appear for me early in the game when it became clear that all wasn’t as it seemed and Sam started becoming self-aware. When the words “BRING HER” flashed on the screen and a strange floating artifact appeared, I got chills down my spine. For some reason, the Observation itself reminded me a lot of Alien’s Nostromo and while there are no jump scares and it’s not scary, Observation’s atmosphere is tense enough to keep you on your toes.

I started playing Observation with mouse and keyboard but soon realised it would be easier using a controller, especially when it came to some of the puzzles requiring inputting codes using the left stick. The puzzles tend to be either drawing schematic patterns of the Observation’s old-school wiring so Sam can unlock hatches between the four arms of the space station or are inputting “Simple Simon” type patterns to rectify hardware issues such as jammed external clamps or to activate ship-wide protocols.

Despite being set in a futuristic space ship, Observation actually made me go old school, again, and I found myself falling back to my old trusty red notebook, scribbling down patterns and notes and the schematics needed to unlock and lock hatches [hey, my memory isn’t what it used to be]. I took photos of things I considered important. I scribbled down words like “launch codes”, “strange artifact”, “protocol” and “space station”. I sketched weird symbols and patterns that flashed up throughout the game. Observation is one of those games that you may well find yourself jotting down schematics on a piece of paper.

Look, I loved Observation from start to finish, eager to find out what the strange alien artifact was all about and intrigued to see whether Sam would go full HAL 9000 by the game’s conclusion [I actually stayed up till 1am on a school night to finish the game].

I thought the ending was a little too cliched but a twist about the 3/4 mark was a nice touch that turned things on its head for the better. The ending also leaves the door open for a potential sequel. Maybe.

Observation is a great first effort from a new studio. I’m interested to see where developer No Code goes from here with its next game.

Late in the piece while writing this review I learned that some of the members of developer No Code were actually on the team that made The Creative Assembly’s Alien Isolation so, yeah, I guess they are fans of the movie Alien. 

Thanks to Devolver Digital’s Australian distributor for the review code.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice review: Where I died more than two times

I won’t be the first person to make this joke, but here goes: I died more than twice during my time with From Software’s farken hard Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. A lot more than twice.

I actually lost count how many times I died but I got very familiar with the death screen. I saw that a lot.

Sekiro™: Shadows Die Twice_20190328001631

Sekiro, set in feudal era Japan with samurai, katana swords and … giant chickens, has a lot in common with From’s previous games Bloodbourne and Dark Souls. For one, they all revel in the brutality of the combat.

Secondly, patience is a virtue in Sekiro. Rush in and chances are you’ll get overwhelmed by foes and end up on the wrong end of a spear or crushed to death and body slammed by an angry ogre.

And thirdly, learn how to deflect enemy blows every time. Deflecting enemy strikes is often the difference between life and bleeding out the rough ground of a Japanese temple. Deflecting blows successfully means you’ll have more chances to deliver fatal blows and deliver deadly finishing moves.

While the Souls series has its bonfires, Sekiro has its sculptor’s shrines which do the same thing: You can rest, you can upgrade your skills and you can travel back to the Sculptor with upgrades to your prosthetic arm, practice some combat with an undead ally or teleport back to locations you’ve already visited.

Every enemy you kill earns skill points, which can be used to upgrade your combat abilities, and when you die you sometimes get the option to resurrect yourself to get back into the fight. It’s a good feature but it does come with one caveat: Every time you use resurrect, villagers in the game world get more inflicted with a rot that has befallen the world. Nasty.

As Sekiro progresses, he finds weapons that can be added to his prosthetic arm (installed by the mysterious Sculptor at a run-down temple that acts as a world hub): A shuriken-throwing appendige, a flamethrower and an axe that can splinter enemy shields. You’ll need to all as you work you way through a variety of enemies that range from cannon fodder to downright nasty.

So, how did I get on with Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice?

Look, I’ve never got on well with From Software games. Bloodbourne and Dark Souls just destroyed me and I’ll be completely honest about Sekiro. I got frustrated a lot and while I didn’t once throw my Dualshock 4 controller at my TV, I found myself switching the game off after dying for the umpteenth time while facing the same mini-boss. It is a frustration-inducing game.

Here, watch this video of me getting my arse kicked by an angry chained ogre. Warning: While it’s not really spoilery, and it’s very early on in the game, if you don’t want to see the angry ogre, turn away now (or just don’t play the video)

I found the game bloody hard (I can hear the cries of “Git Gud” ringing out right now) and frequently became overwhelmed by foes, backing myself into a corner and spamming the deflect button. I learned very quickly that doesn’t work too well. You have to time the deflect to perfection: Spamming does nothing. I often found the best defence against multiple foes was actually running like hell and avoiding them until I could find a safe rooftop and jump up and have a rest.

Do you see the bastard chicken in the background?

Sekiro is one of those games that one moment you feel like you’ve got to grips with things, using the prosthetic arm attached to your arm to propel you to the top of temples and high stone walls, locking onto an enemy then jumping and delivering a death-blow (complete with spurting blood!) Then the next, when you thought you’d mastered the skills needed to progress, you’re surrounded by giant chickens, which crow your position to nearby soldiers, which then pelt you with by flaming arrows … then you’re pecked to death by said giant chickens.

I can hear the hordes, yelling in the background now: “Git Gud,” “Git Gud,” “Git Gud”.

The way I’m feeling about Sekiro right now, I’d love to say I’ll stick with the game, but being honest, I don’t really think I have the stamina – or patience – to make it through. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is actually making me feel like I’m a bad video game player, and I don’t think I am.

Fans of games like Bloodbourne and Dark Souls will probably revel in Sekiro, but that’s not me.

Excuse me, while I search for the confidence that Sekiro has robbed from me.

Thanks to Total Interactive in New Zealand for the copy of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. 

 

 

Sekiro Shadows Die Twice is almost upon us

Sekiro Shadows Die Twice, from the same crowd that bought us Bloodbourne and Dark Souls, is out later this month (March 22) and Activision have released a truckload of new screen shots.

Feast your eyes, gamers.

I wonder if Sekiro will be as difficult as the Dark Souls series: Those games kicked my arse severely.

 

Gaming news: Hot & fresh

Marvel’s Spider-Man most searched for Kiw gamers

PriceSpy got in touch this week, telling me that Marvel’s Spider-Man (PS4) was the most searched game in New Zealand for January.

Insomniac’s rather good swinging simulator was released in September last year but is obviously still a favourite with PS4 games in Aotearoa. I rather liked it, if my late review is anything to go by.

PriceSpy says the game has also had “significant” price drops since it was released, the biggest savings coming in December, 2018 and January this year.

Rounding out the top five most searched games were Kingdom Hearts III (PS4), Super Smash Bros Ultimate (Nintendo Switch), Red Dead Redemption 2 (PS4) and New Super Mario Bros U – Deluxe Edition (Switch).

Star Wars Republic Commando coming to Games with Gold

During a post in January, I lamented that one of my most favourite Star Wars games Republic Commando was a brilliant game but we would never see a sequel. Well, it seems that while we’re not getting a new game or a sequel, Xbox is releasing the original Xbox title (which also supports Xbox One backward compatibility) is coming to Games with Gold during March.

This brings joy to my heart so I’ll definitely be checking it out and see whether the Xbox One ups the graphical fidelity any. I’d still like to see a sequel or remaster of Republic Commando, though, although, given that EA has the license to create Star Wars games and really has no idea what it’s doing with it, I won’t hold my breath.

Meanwhile, over at PlayStation …

The Witness_20160128200456

Not to be outdone, PlayStation Plus members are also getting some digital treats next month, with Call of Duty Modern Warfare Remastered and Jonathan Blow’s pretty but perplexing puzzle game The Witness both coming to Sony’s current console.

Sorry, PlayStation, but Xbox wins this month for me simply because one of my favourite Star Wars games of all time, Republic Commando, is on Games with Gold. Plus, there’s also the fact that I don’t actually have a PlayStation Plus account, either …