Returning to my teenage years: My build of Bandai’s Stormtrooper kitset [Part 1]

I’m trying something new here at Gamejunkie and documenting my build of a Bandai kitset model. If you like it, it could be the first of many changes on the site where I venture into new territory for me a little.

It’s scary to admit it but 30 years ago, or so, when I was a teenager I saw the original Star Wars trilogy and it started a journey that I’m starting to get back into now, with the release of The Force Awakens.

I had so much Star Wars stuff: Comic books that my grandmother collected from a weekly women’s magazine, Marvel’s comic book adaption of The Empire Strikes Back, activity books, action figures, art books, cards from bubble gun, a beach towel, a duvet cover and pillow case … the list goes on.

Perhaps my favourite SW things, though, were the kitset models I had: A snowspeeder, a speeder bike, and my most loved, a model AT-AT that my father and I built. It was magnificent and we even made a base with plaster of paris snow to attach it to. It was awesome – but it got smashed by some half-wit removal company guys when we moved from Wellington to Christchurch.

I’d always had a love of SW kitset models and over the past few years I’d played with the idea of getting back into it but I never did – until now. I think the catalyst was the new SW movie, The Force Awakens. It just prompted me to get back into Star Wars kitset models again.

So when I got back from our Christmas holiday, a coupe of weeks ago I went on Trademe and bought a Bandai Stormtrooper kitset – and I couldn’t have been happier. I tossed up getting a vehicle (Snowspeeder or AT-ST) or Boba Fett, but I decided thta  the Boba Fett might be too advanced for me: It would need some painting skills to weather him up so he looked battle-worn, and I don’t have those skills. So, I decided on the Stormtrooper and I’m glad I did.

The Stormtrooper is perhaps one of the most iconic characters from the original Star Wars trilogy and they just look cool. Badass. So, yeah, the Stormtrooper it was. What I really liked about these Bandai kitsets is that there is no glue to join the parts together: Everything is snapped together, so it’s clean and there’s no mess. What I also liked is that all the black underneath the white armour is separate pieces, like a suit, so it makes for a more realistic look.

I also decided that I’d document the build process, which is something different for my site, but I thought if you’re considering buying one and doing what I did, I thought you might like to see the process. It’s not a step-by-step build, with photos of me making each piece, but it shows the progress as I go. I’ve also posted three of short videos of the head/helmet/body build before the photos. I’m thinking I’ll post the build process in two or three parts.

I’m really pleased with the finished product, which probably took me about 5 hours total over two days, and I’ve already decided that I want to expand my stormtrooper collection so am hunting for the next project.

I hope you like watching the process to build the kitset. Let me know what you think in the comments.

Here we go: First up, is part 1 that shows the box, the sprues the parts are attached to, building the head and chest & connecting the head to the body. Enjoy.

   

 

The box for the Bandai Stormtrooper kitset model. It's a nice box.
The box for the Bandai Stormtrooper kitset model. It’s a nice box.
All the pieces that make up the model. Those things are called sprues. I didn't know that until recently.
All the pieces that make up the model. Those things are called sprues. I didn’t know that until recently.
The instructions for the kitset model. Yep, they're all in Japanese - but there are pictures, so that was great.
The instructions for the kitset model. Yep, they’re all in Japanese – but there are pictures, so that was great.
All the sprues out of the box, ready for me to start. I don't know how many parts there are, but it looks a lot.
All the sprues out of the box, ready for me to start. I don’t know how many parts there are, but it looks a lot.
The storm trooper's head complete. It's actually about five or six parts, all snapped together to form the one piece.
The storm trooper’s head complete. It’s actually about five or six parts, all snapped together to form the one piece.
The next three images show the torso complete with the neck attached.
The next three images show the torso complete with the neck attached.

IMAG0606IMAG0607

So it seems I forgot to take some photos of building the groin area, which you can see attached to the torso. The head is now attached to the neck, which is on a balljoint, meaning it can be articulated.
So it seems I forgot to take some photos of building the groin area, which you can see attached to the torso. The head is now attached to the neck, which is on a ball joint, meaning it can be articulated.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s