Figment review: Battling the thoughts in your head

Figment, a puzzle/platformer for Finish indie developer Bedtime Digital Games for the Nintendo Switch, reminds me a lot of a children’s story book, with its whimsical artwork and fairy tale locations, except it’s set within the human mind with all sorts of weird shit going on.

Seriously, though, for most of the game the environments are like something you’d find in Alice in Wonderland, with teapots for houses, flowers made out of stringed instruments and white fluffy clouds providing a peaceful backdrop, things are more sinister than they seem at first in this fairy tale land, populated with memories, thoughts and urges and home to the voices in our head.

When Dusty (the game opens with him relaxing in a rocking chair, dreaming of ice for his drink) finds the nasty figments of the imagination have invaded the world, causing chaos, he must save the day. Accompanied by ever-optimistic bird Piper, Dusty must battle his way through a variety of dangers to, well, save the day.

The sumptuous visuals are the first thing that will attract your attention with Figment: They’re said by the developers to be hand-drawn, and by golly, does it look gorgeous, with an art style that belies the undertones of what Bedtime has called a “musical action adventure”.

The second thing that you’ll be captivated with is the wonderful voice acting which at times is delightfully over-the-top, and the musical score: Both are just delightful, with the score supposedly “defined by your exploration of the world”, which means that it adapts to how you react with the world: Move closer to the cello-like flowers and the strings sing, wander closer to a tuba-looking tree and the music takes a more brass band-like tone. It’s delightful and really adds a nice personal touch to the game.

The puzzles won’t cause you to have a brain haemorrhage, ranging from things like tracking down the handle that will turn the windmill that will blow away the nasty black fog and finding the right colour battery that will power the windmill to finding the missing pieces of a brass band bridge that will let you cross to another part of the world. Combat generally involves Dusty whacking unspeakable horrors with his sword or knocking back projectiles from said unspeakable horrors.

Figment is a delight to play, both visually and the way that the sound reacts to the player’s movement through the game world, and it’s further proof that games from small independent developers are a perfect fit for Nintendo’s console.

Remember how I commented last week on the great year that Nintendo was having?  Well, Figment is further proof of that.

Thanks to Bedtime for providing a digital code for Figment

Red Dead Redemption 2: I am ready

Rockstar dropped a game play trailer of the upcoming Red Dead Redemption 2 this morning, and after watching it today, I pity any other game/s that is/are coming out in October because, seriously, RDR2 is going to leave them sniffling wrecks, crying, curled up in the corner of a room.

Here’s 6 minutes and five seconds of RDR2. I pre-ordered this game two months ago. I usually never pre-order video games. In fact, I’ve pre-ordered only two video games in 40 years of playing video games (this and Batman Arkham Knight).

I have no more words. Just watch the trailer.

God, October can’t come fast enough. My PlayStation 4 is ready and waiting.

Element: An RTS game for people who really don’t have time for RTS games

Element (Nintendo Switch)

What a year the Nintendo Switch has had.

Despite being the least powerful console of the big three (Nintendo, Microsoft and PlayStation), I can quite comfortably say that I spent more time playing games on my Switch than I do the other consoles I own.

There are so many great reasons to own a Switch, and Element, from New Zealand developer Flightless, is another one.It’s a perfect fit for the Nintendo Switch.

Element’s narrative involves a space craft fleeing a decaying solar system. Arriving in a new solar system, you must visit each planet (named after elements on the periodic table, ie barium, titanium, silicon, gallium), mining enough crucial resources to ensure your survival. Sounds simple, right? Well, kind of. You see, while you’re mining for resources, enemies are doing the same thing, You’ll have to build attack and defence forces and assault the enemy while mining the planet for all you can.

Early planets like Boron offer very little challenge, with minimal enemy presence, but by the time you get to planets like platinum, the enemy threat starts increasing. Planets like iridium and neon, have well established enemies that pose a dangerous threat.

Element is a really nice fit on the Switch, with an appealing low-poly look to it and intuitive controls. Using the Switch’s touch screen, you can zoom into the action so you can get a good handle on things and strategize accordingly, and rotate around planets using the right analogue stick.  After a while, you’ll find yourself rotating around a planet like an old hand, plonking down mines and defence units as you target enemy mines with missiles.

It feels a little bit Command & Conquer to me sometimes,  making you think strategically before you do something  while also making you think two steps ahead for potential threats.

Flightless has described Element as a real-time space strategy game for those who don’t have time for real-time space strategy games which, let’s be honest, is probably a lot of us these days. It’s the sort of game that is perfect for bite-sized gaming chunks during lunchtime or just before bedtime, letting you play through two or three planets in a session then call it quits for the night but still feel satisfied.

Update: Something that I suddenly thought about after an email exchange with Flightless director John O’Reilly was that Element would really work with a two-player network co-op mode where where each player controlled a faction. I think that would really work well with the game play in Element. 

 

Thanks to Flightless for the Element review code

 

No Man’s Sky Next: Is Hello Games’ space game worth a re-visit?

What a difference two years makes, eh?

In 2016, Hello Games (with, let’s not forget, considerable marketing support from PlayStation) launched procedurally generated space exploration game No Man’s Sky on the PlayStation 4. Hello Game’s  leader Sean Murray touted all the amazing things players would be able to do in the game and the hype just flowed.

Turns out, though, a lot of the stuff that Murray mentioned you would be able to do, you actually couldn’t. No Man’s Sky was a game that gave me conflicting emotions when it was launched. Here’s a quote from my review:“No Man’s Sky is probably one of the few games that I’ve really been conflicted about it. I like that you can explore a huge galaxy – and Hello Games have done a nice job of making you feel you are in a huge universe – but I’m not really big on the fact that after a few hours the game becomes a grind and, frankly, a little tedious.
Hello Games is an indie studio – despite the fact that PlayStation handled all its PS4 marketing – and should be applauded for trying something risky and ambitious, but I can’t help but think that because of the massive hype heaped upon it by both PlayStation, games media and gamers themselves, it was never going to live up to expectations.”

Looking back at my coverage of No Man’s Sky, it seems I, too, was caught up in the hype surrounding the game. I posted quite a few videos before release, and my review wasn’t overly critical, closing with “I’m sure in a few months No Man’s Sky will be a much different game to the one that it is now (a new patch was released for PC and PS4 on Friday) and chances are I’ll revisit it sometime in the future just to see to see what has changed.

Well, two years [and some other updates] later, and No Man’s Sky is the game it should have been at launch thanks to the recent Next update and it’s a great update (all the images here are captured using the game’s photo mode)   but it begs the question: Should Hello Games have just waited two years to release the game in a more complete state rather than release it when they did, half-finished ?

The answer is, of course, yes. The original game was rightly pilloried by gamers and critics alike because it wasn’t what Sean Murray at Hello Games promised it was. It also wasn’t what Sony hyped it up to be in the flashy trailers it sent to games writers like me. Gamers around the world bought it based on all these promises , and were swept up in the hype that only the games industry seems to be able to generate. Gamers thought they could do all these amazing things but were disappointed  when they found much of what they were promised was untrue.

I think it’s admirable that Sean and Hello Games have stuck with No Man’s Sky, despite all the criticisms and negative press, and kept updating it. I take my hat off to him and the studio. They could have easily said “Ok, game is launched, we’ve got our cash. Let’s jet off to a tropical island somewhere and hunker down” but they did. They stuck it out and supported the game.

I’m making my way through the game again thanks to the Next update and it feels like a completely different game from launch –   planets are more detailed and varied, crafting has been tweaked, there’s a third-person view for ships and your avatar, plus dozens of other tweaks – but the grind is still there. If you weren’t a fan first time around, I doubt new graphics and changed game play features will convince you to stick this out.

Sadly, though,  part of me feels that no matter how impressive the Next update is – and it is impressive, especially compared to the original game  – the damage has already been done for No Man’s Sky and a lot of gamers have already been burned by the launch state of the game.

It’s a sad indictment on the gaming industry that two years later, No Man’s Sky is now the game it should have been. As gamers, we shouldn’t  be content with paying for games then hoping they’ll get fixed into something better sometime down the line but it seems to be a worrying trend that is becoming more and more common these days.

If you haven’t played No Man’s Sky before – and Xbox One players can now see what all the fuss is about – then now is probably the perfect time to do it: It’s the game that it should have been at launch, and newcomers haven’t been burned by what happened before. That said, I’m sure owners of the original game (if they still have it) in their droves are revisiting the game thanks to the Next update, as I have done, but I think No Man’s Sky is a lesson for the entire games industry to take note of:  Don’t ship a game that promises things it will never deliver on.

Here’s some simple advice for game developers and (perhaps, especially, publishers/marketers): Delay the game until it does what you say it does. Don’t bow to publisher pressure to release a game way too early just because it wants the sales revenue.

As a gamer, I’d rather wait a few more months for a better game, and be satisfied, than buy a game that is half-finished and doesn’t let me do what you’ve hyped it up to do, and will never deliver on those lofty expectations.

Gamers will forgive you for a game that’s late but does what it says on the box.They’re  not so forgiving when you promise them the moon and all you hand them is a pebble.

OK, so to answer the question I put in this blog post’s title: Is Hello Games’ space game worth a revisit? Thanks to the Next update, yes, it is. I’ve still had the game crash on me since after a post-update patch (funnily enough, changing my PS4’s internal clock to Pacific Standard Time seemed to fix it), but the game is much improved on the original. It’s just a pity it took two years for that to happen.

 

Captain Toad Treasure Tracker review

A question to start off just because it popped into my head while I was playing Captain Toad Treasure Tracker: Why is a character that looks a bit like a mushroom called Captain Toad? Is it because he looks kind of like a toadstool? (Update: I just Googled it and it’s because he’s a toad. So ignore everything I just said)

Anyhoo, Captain Toad Treasure Tracker originally appeared on Nintendo’s Wii U and is an action puzzle game based off the Adventures of Captain Toad levels in Super Mario World 3D. The Switch version also contains four levels based on Super Mario Odyssey.

Players control the titular Captain Toad  around an isometric viewpoint which you can rotate around, navigating obstacles to collect a golden star at the end of every level. Manipulating the viewpoint with the right stick reveals secret rooms and hidden areas, many holding collectibles. When you’ve completed a level, you can do it again to find the pixel Toad hiding somewhere.

Captain Toad can’t jump, especially when he’s wearing a backpack, but he can pull up turnips that he can toss at enemies to stun them. The game also lets you manipulate platforms and the like by touching the Switch’s touch screen.

Look, I’m an adult in my late 40s, haven’t played the original on Wii U, and can pretty much guarantee I’m not the target audience, but I found Captain Toad Treasure Tracker the perfect antidote from the pressures of daily life when I had a few precious moments spare to play something lighthearted. Each level will take only a few minutes to complete so with many of us time poor these days due to general life demands, it’s just the bite-sized gaming that the doctor ordered – and it suits the Switch portable nature perfectly.

Praise aside, Captain Toad presents more of a dilemma for those gamers who have already played the game on the Wii U, though, as if you’ve already played it on that console – or own it on that console – I don’t see much merit in you double-dipping just because it’s on Nintendo’s latest console (especially given it’ll set you back between $55 and $70, according to Pricespy).

For gamers like me, who hadn’t played Captain Toad Treasure Tracker before, this is a good introduction to the adventures of the cute little toad, and is just the ticket if you’ve got a few minutes spare for some light-hearted puzzle action.

Thanks to Nintendo for the review copy of Captain Toad Treasure Tracker (Nintendo Switch). The game is also available on Nintendo DS, as well.

King Tide: Battle Royale with bite

 

Thanks to games like Fortnite and PubG, the Battle Royale genre has grown hugely in popularity over the past few years with gamers, each essentially following the same format with land-based kill-under-your-killed game play.

I’m not a Battle Royale player because – and let’s not beat about the bush here – I suck at multi-player games but New Zealand development studio Digital Confectioners is hoping its watery take on the genre will take it to, ahem, new depths with its new game, King Tide, a Aquatic (Battle) Royale game that places players in scuba suits swimming around the Deep Blue, having to face off against sharks as well as each other, rather than on land.

King Tide seems to be continuing Digital Confectioner’s nautical-themed games – its last one was Depth, where players were either a shark or a diver – and pits 100 players against each other, having to avoid depth charges, aforementioned sharks and forces players to scavenge for weapons in locations such as sunken ships, reefs and underwater labs.

The game is planned to go Early Access on Steam in August this year, with the developers reckoning it’ll be in that state for at least a year, with version 1.0 anticipated to launch around July, 2019. According the game’s FAQ, King Tide will set you back $US14.99, it won’t contain loot boxes (but perhaps sunken treasure chests?) and additional game play content will be through free game updates.

Time to sharpen the spear gun (not that I have one, that is)?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Objects in Space: Old-school space adventuring

I first met Leigh Harris, the Australian behind indie game developer Flat Earth Game‘s Objects in Space (now in Early Access) during the early 2000s when he did PR for Rockstar and Take Two Interactive for Australia and New Zealand.

Leigh was an instantly likeable and pleasant PR man who, importantly, understood  how gamers and journalists thought, and more importantly, did whatever he could to accommodate me, a then-kind-of-full-time-games writer across the ditch in New Zealand.

Little did I know that years later, I’d be closely following Leigh’s fascinating journey as a game developer and co-founder of Flat Earth Games  after a career spanning PR and video games journalism.

Flat Earth’s first game was a crafting and city building game called Towncraft (2011), which I remember playing, I think, on my iPod Touch. Next came Metrocide (2014), a top-down stealth action game that had strong vibes of Blade Runner and Deus Ex to it.

When Flat Earth announced Objects in Space, I sat up and took a little more notice. Here was an open-world, stealth trading game set in a huge universe where you’re the captain of your vessel but have to manage everything yourself, managing multiple screens and controls to ensure success, taking on contracts to earn coin and generally be a jack of all trades out in space.I just seemed like an intriguing take on the space genre.

Think of Objects in Space as strategic management of space travel and adventuring where you have to take contracts, deliver goods, upgrade your ship and outrun pirates  rather than dog-fighting through the asteroids, barking orders at Mr Chekhov to set deflector shields to full and pointing photon torpedoes at fast-approaching enemies, threatening to blow them to smithereens.

In fact, combat is more akin to submarines waging a stealthy battle underwater than toe-to-toe laser battles (in fact, I think Leigh likens the combat to that between submarines and Objects in Space is complex and deep (very, very complex and deep)  but strangely satisfying, keeping me up at night when I’d told my wife I was going to bed in “10 minutes after I’ve done this thing.” (As you probably guessed, I didn’t go to bed in 10 minutes)

I bought Objects in Space for two reasons. One: It was genuinely fascinated in what Leigh and Flat Earth Games was doing here (and for around $20 I had nothing to lose) after following its progress over the past few years, and two: I wanted to support an indie developer/studio that I genuinely felt deserved to succeed.

I’m enjoying it far more than I expected I would as it has an old-school feel about it to the games that I grew up with as a child, especially the low-poly graphics. I grew up on Lucasart point-and-click games, games like Magic Carpet from Bullfrog, Ultimate Play The Game stuff on the ZX Spectrum. Objects in Space just appeals to that old-school gamer in me where game play was king and graphics took second place, and I love that about it..

I can’t say I really know what I’m doing most of the time (and what have the screens do) and must admit that I have no confidence in my abilities in how to successfully navigate the universe of Objects in Space but so far, my time with this space sim has been nothing but a joy.

 

 

 

Wolfenstein: The New Colossus (Switch): Panic Button has the Reich touch

Think about this for a minute: I can now play a current-generation first person shooter while sitting on the toilet. Not that I did for this review but, you know, if I can if I want to.

Or in bed while my wife reads on her iPad. Or during my lunch break at work. What a world we live in, eh?

I have to say I’m impressed with what Panic Button have done with Wolfenstein on the Switch.

Sure, if you want the most graphical superior version of the game then the Switch version isn’t for you and if you’re the type of gamer that will balk at lower resolutions then, again, the Switch version isn’t for you.It’s for gamers like me who haven’t played the game on another platform and it’s for gamers who want to play Bethesda’s latest Nazi-killing simulator on the go, filling the well-worn combat boots of BJ Blazkowicz in a story of what the world would be like if Nazi’s had won WW2 and invaded the US of A.

Wolfenstein 2 is the second Bethesda shooter from Panic Button that has appeared on the Switch and right off the bat, the port seems a much smoother experience right off the bat than the port of Doom, which took a few patches to sort its frame rates out.

Make  no mistake, this version is the real deal in terms of content: It’s the same game that appeared on the PC, Xbox One and PlayStation 4 last year but, as is to be expected for a portable machine that has a fraction of the processing power of its rivals, Panic Button has made compromises to get the game working on the Switch.

As you’d expect, textures are much lower in resolution (mostly noticeable on faces and clothing), it uses a dynamic resolution to adjust the pixel count on the fly and the game is locked at 30 frames a second.To my old man eyes, I thought the game ran smoothly in both docked and portable mode (looking slightly better in portable mode given the smaller screen) and I had a blast.

One thing I did notice  due to the lower resolution and blurrier textures, was every now and then textures would pop in a few moments later, and at times,  picking out enemies and power ups in some locations was much, much harder than it should have been, especially when in portable mode.

Can you see the subtitles? No, I can’t either.

I found the text size of subtitles was too small for my old man eyes. Even with my reading glasses on, I struggled to read them. Dear Panic Button, perhaps an upcoming patch might address that issue?

The latest adventures of BJ Blazkowicz is a battery hog, though.  I started the game with 79% battery & by the time I’d completed the first mission and a few minutes of the second mission, my Switch’s battery was down to 42% – and the wee thing’s internal fan was working overdrive.  Wolfenstein is working the Nintendo Switch to within an inch of its life but, frankly, I can see why.

Look, Wolfenstein: The New Colossus is going to have its detractors but I tip my hat to Panic Button: The developer has knocked it out of the park with this portable version and I’m glad I waited until now to play it, to be honest.

It’s just an added bonus that I can also now play Wolfenstein The New Colossus on the toilet, if I’m that way inclined, of course. I’ll keep you posted.

Thanks to Bethesda in Australia for the review copy of the game.

 

 

 

Huawei P20 review

Huawei’s P20 is the (slightly) cheaper sibling of the Chinese company’s flagship P20 Pro.

And like the Pro model, it’s clear Huawei has put a lot of effort into the camera on the P20, as it has two Leica Summilux lenses on the back and a neural processing unit in the handset that Huawei says will help you become a better photographer (the P20 Pro has three lenses).

Now, I can’t vouch for whether the P20 will help me become a better photographer but I was impressed that the camera’s software instantly recognised my dog (the tag dog appeared on the phone’s screen) when I pointed the phone at my dog.

Here’s a photo of my dog, Drew, taken with the P20. There’s one of the view out the window when I flew to Queenstown for work the other day and another one I took at night using the night mode. (The camera’s AI wasn’t infallible, though: I pointed at my wife and it briefly flashed up the tag cat – before quickly changing to portrait!)

Woof woof!

Nice view!

Less than starry night.

The P20 is a smart-looking phone, too, with a glass back that screams quality (but is also a finger print magnet) and a great screen.  The power and volume up/down buttons are on the right hand side and the P20 sports a USB-C connection on its base.

Huawei’s unit has gone the way of the latest iPhones and forsaken the 3.5mm headphone jack (so bluetooth earbuds/earphones only) and unfortunately, doesn’t have a slot for a microSD expansion card. Just like the iPhone X, the P20 has a “notch” at the top of the screen but it wasn’t too distracting, to be honest. The battery life seemed pretty good in normal day-to-day usage.

The P20 is fast and responsive, thanks to its 2.4Ghz Kirin 970 chip, and comes with 4Gb of memory and 128Gb of storage, which is handy. All in all, it’s a competent phone that ticks all the right boxes but here’s the thing:  I think Huawei has shot itself in the foot a little as I don’t think  that priced as it is (ranging in price in NZ from $900 to $1129), the P20 can compete with Huawei’s own P20 Pro, which offers more features for only a few hundred dollars more.

I mean, if you’ve got the money, it’s a no brainer to go with the more powerful unit, right? I know I would.

Thanks to Huawei for the review unit

Win God of War/Detroit Become Human thanks to GameJunkieNZ & PriceSpy

SPONSORED POST

When there’s a new game release out, there’s nothing more frustrating than buying it, only to
find that when get home, you could have otherwise purchased that very same game
elsewhere for cheaper!
PriceSpy is New Zealand’s biggest comprehensive, fully impartial price and product
comparison service that aims to help consumers shop smartly and save money.
Used by approximately one million users each month in New Zealand, PriceSpy can be
downloaded for free via a handy app. The app provides shoppers instant access to 95,000
indexed prices,1,840,000 products, 4,130,000 product features and hundreds of thousands
of product and shop ratings, so they can make informed purchase decisions.
Simply search by product features, popularity, brand, price, user reviews and much more. If
that’s not enough, the app also allows shoppers to click on the price and popularity history of
a particular product they are looking to buy, to reveal whether shops are offering the item at
the best price possible!
What’s especially useful, is you also have the ability to create price change notifications.
These send push notifications direct to your phone, so that if the price of the item you are
looking to buy changes – you never need be caught out again!
So, when looking to buy your next game for your collection, avoid that dreadful feeling of
buyer’s remorse. Download the PriceSpy app for yourself, to see just how much money you
can save.
PriceSpy has teamed up with GameJunkie NZ to offer one lucky reader the opportunity to
win PriceSpy’s two most popular games in May 2018: God of War (PS4) and Detroit:
Become Human (PS4).
To enter, simply email gamejunkienz@gmail.com, telling me why you deserve to win the two games.
Important things you need to know: 
 Once the winner has been drawn, PriceSpy / GameJunkieNZ will be in touch to organise delivery of the two games.

 The competition is open to New Zealand residents only with a New Zealand postal address.  Sorry, overseas readers: You can’t enter.

 One entry per email address. PriceSpy/GameJunkieNZ’s decision is final.