Late to the Party: Spider-Man review

Selfie courtesy of the game’s photo mode.

Late to the Party is a n infrequent feature when I review a game that has been out for a while but I haven’t been able to review it at launch. Today, I’m looking at Spider-Man, on the PlayStation 4, which arrived a day after I had left for vacation in Canada. I was gone for a month.

For me, the Peter Parker in Insomniac’s Spider-Man isn’t the youthful Tom Holland from the most recent Avengers movies (inexperienced and unsure of his abilities), nor Toby Maguire’s Peter Parker (new to the superhero lark), but Andrew Garfield’s Peter Parker, a superhero that is comfortable with his abilities and wearing the red-and-blue suit, but a little socially awkward at times.

In Insomniac’s Spider-Man, Peter Parker has been spinning the web for a while now, so he’s come to grips with his abilities and what he is capable of and the narrative features an ensemble cast of well-known villains and characters from Spider-Man lore, including Doctor Otto Octavius (Doc Oct), Martin Li (Mister Negative) Scorpion, Tombstone, Electro, (love interest) Mary Jane, Aunt May and Norman Osborn. The story has Peter defeating crime kingpin Wilson Fisk in the opening moments of the game,  putting him behind bars, only for another crime lord to rise in his place in the form of Martin Li, or Mister Negative.

As I write this, I’ve been back from  Canada for almost a week and have completed about 55 per cent of Spider-Man’s main campaign, collected 50 of the 55 backpacks and done about half a dozen research missions.I’ve also taken on thugs patrolling construction sites, tried to (unsuccessfully) capture wayward pigeons and had my arse kicked (a few times) by men armed with electric whips.

One of the first things that I noticed with Spider-Man is that Insomniac have nailed the swinging mechanic perfectly. Before too long, you’ll be performing acrobatics between skyscrapers towering above the traffic and pedestrian-filled streets and zipping through the air. In fact, the swinging mechanic is so good I didn’t feel the want (or need) to use the game’s fast travel system: It was more fun getting to the location using the old-fashioned Spidey way.

Melee combat is integral to Spider-Man and it’s top-notch, reminding me a lot of the combat in  Rocksteady’s Batman Arkham series, and once I’d got to grips with the plethora of moves and combos, combat was fast and fluid, with me being able to guide Spidey from foe to foe seamlessly, filling up my suit’s focus meter which then let me unleash brutal finishing moves on hapless foes.

I watched my son, who has completed the main story (yeah, yeah, it’ll ruin the story for me. I know), and there were some hallucination sequences that, again, reminded me a heck of a lot of Rocksteady’s Arkham series (you know the segments where a tiny Batman has to sneak around while a giant Scarecrow taunts him). I’m saying that as praise, not a criticism, by the way.

There’s a lot to do in Spider-Man when you’re not doing the main story mission, from collecting backpacks that Peter has left dotted around the city and doing research for Harry Osborn using laboratories he has left around the city to unlocking corrupted communications towers (which is a game mechanic that I think has been done to death in video games) and taking selfies at famous New York landmarks. While some of the busy work seems formulaic, a lot of it was a good break from the hectic moments of the main story.

There’s a benefit to that busywork, too: The more collectibles and side stuff  you complete, the more weapons, gadgets, skills and suit mods you can unlock so there’s a real incentive to do the busy work: The results are well worth it. I mean, what’s not to love about a bomb that explodes, showering all around it with web or electric web that shocks enemies.

One thing I wasn’t a fan of is the wave-based enemy system used when you want to take down construction sites under Fisk’s control and demon bases ruled by Li but defeating bases is essential to unlock in-game Spidey suits, so I tolled away at them, but it was  my least favourite aspect of the game.

Spider-Man doesn’t  invent the wheel when it comes to third-person action games – plenty of other games have done the same thing and Spider-Man does fall into the formulaic overused video game tropes at times  – but Insomniac’s Marvel superhero game is so much bloody fun, with an engaging narrative, well-fleshed out characters and great game mechanics that it’s another reason why, for me, PlayStation is simply owning this console generation hands down.

Now to see if I can complete it before Red Dead Redemption 2 drops this week (I’ve pre-ordered the game: I’m not getting review code). I don’t like my chances.

Reaching for the stars – Starlink: Battle for Atlas review

Ubisoft might be a little late to the party when it comes to toys-that-appear-in-your-games peripherals but with Starlink: Battle for Atlas, the company could have a hit with pint-sized space explorers who like to play with toys as part of the game they’re playing.

Starlink: Battle for Atlas treads the commonly told tale of an evil entity wanting to take over the solar system and it’s up to you to save the day but central to Ubisoft’s space game are the plastic spaceships and figures that use a special mount that fits to your controller then brings the ships to life in-game.

Fox McCloud’s famous starship & the special base that the Joycon’s slot into and the spaceship toy locks into.

I played the Nintendo Switch version (it’s also available on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One), where you slide a Joycon onto each side of the mount then attach the spaceship toy/ you have. Each craft and pilot has different abilities and weapons. The toy feels a little heavy on the controller to start with but you soon get used to it. As a bonus for Nintendo Switch players, the Switch version has a toy based off  Fox McCloud’s Arwing spaceship and the wily fox himself – and it’s a beauty of a craft, and Fox plays a major role in the game, with Switch exclusive missions focusing on the Star Fox team.

Fox McCloud in the flesh. Well, plastic. Alongside him is pilot Mason Rana.

  If you’re something of a toy collector then things could get expensive if you decide to buy as many ships as you can afford. The starter pack costs around $118 with additional ships setting you back about $58 a pop for a spaceship. Additional weapons packs cost around $30. You snap on the attachments, which appear in-game and you can swap out weapons and modify them on the fly, depending on the enemy you’re squaring off against.

Some of the other spaceships that you can buy for Starlink: Battle for Atlas.

That said, the toys aren’t necessary to actually play the game so you don’t have to buy them if you don’t want to: You can play it without spending a cent on the ships and weapon attachments, if you want. The game takes place on a variety of planets with different fauna and flora, as well as the Atlas star system, and while there is a bit of a grind where you have to explore planets for clues to help you in your missions, mine for resources, form alliances with other alien races and do busy work for locals to move the story forward,  I was surprised how much of a smile it put on my face. Maybe it was the fact that I was controlling the on-screen spaceship with a controller that looked like the on-screen spaceship. The combat is fast and fluid enough, and it seems to hold a pretty consistent frame rate on the Switch, something that is vital for a game that relies on fast reflexes. It’s a lot of fun, too,  swapping out weapons mid-battle when you realise your initial arsenal isn’t up to scratch, but young players might find the intricacies of weapons management mid-battle  a little daunting, though. Starlink: Battle for Atlas is a lot of fun, even with the grinding busy work and some repetitive missions, but the toys add a different dimension to the game play that will appeal to spaceship fans. Parents, just keep in mind that the cost will mount up if your game fan wants more and more ships and weapons. Heck, 10-year-old me would have danced with delight if I’d been able to play a game like Starlink: Battle for Atlas with its snap-on space ships and weapons. Thanks to Five Eight Distribution for the review copy of Starlinke: Battle for Atlas and the toys.

No blog for a while: I’m on holiday

Morning.

I was hoping to have a review of Spider-Man for you before I left for four weeks holiday in Canada – but, alas, the review code has not appeared. If it does, it’ll after I get back in mid-October, before I kick into Red Dead Redemption 2 (which I’ve pre-ordered).

As the title says, I’m on holiday for four weeks, touring around Canada and its locales. I won’t be updating the blog during that time.

Thanks to those of you that still stick around: I do appreciate your loyalty.

If you follow me on Twitter, I’ll post photos of my Canadian adventures.

See ya.

Good on ‘ya, mate: Australian gaming site Player 2 streaming for charity

Despite our Trans-Tasman rivalries, I’m very fond of the game writing chums in Australia that I know and interact with, so I’m always happy to help out when one of my fellow game writers across the ditch is doing something that benefits those less fortunate.

So, read on for a press release from Player 2’s Matt Hewson about the site’s upcoming gaming marathon for the Terry Campese Foundation in Australia. There’s the chance to win quite a few game-related prizes if you’re watching the live stream, too.

After a successful charity event last year, the Player 2 team are coming back once again to raise money for the Terry Campese Foundation. Last year the team raised over $3700 for the charity, every cent of which went to helping sick and underprivileged families from the Canberra and Southern NSW regions. This year the crew aim to beat that mark and are looking at the possibility of reaching $4000.

The 24-hour gaming marathon will occur on the 15th of September, kicking off at 10am and running for a full day. The team will be playing one game every hour, including titles such as The Halo Master Chief Collection, Rock Band, Street Fighter Anniversary Collection and the ever-popular NBA Jam, all in the name of this great cause.

To encourage people to donate the Player 2 team has gotten together an impressive list of prizes that includes over 200 items. Games such as Spider-Man, Far Cry 5 and Nier Automata are up for grabs along with great books, soundtracks, merchandise and even a working Pip-Boy 3000! All of these prizes will be given out to people that donate $2 or more to the event.

“The chance to help out a charity such as Terry’s is an honour and a privilege” said Player 2 Editor, Matt Hewson.

“At Player 2, we often lament the lack of positive coverage our favourite hobby receives from mainstream media, so we feel it is our responsibility to lead by example. We are a small site in the grand scheme of things, but as we have shown previously our size doesn’t stop us from helping out in a meaningful way. The Terry Campese Foundation is a charity that aims to help those who are struggling in life, be it from illness or poverty, and that is something I feel we can all get behind”

The whole event will be live streamed on the Player 2 twitch channel and will covered extensively on Player 2’s social media channels, with on-the-spot giveaways for viewers and followers. For more information about the Player 2 Charity Marathon Supporting The Terry Campese Foundation head to http://www.player2.net.au

It’s a Sunday night, I’ve had a busy week (including attending a work conference all day today) , my brain is tired, so here’s a press release prepared earlier by PriceSpy. Normal service will resume this coming week. Perhaps.

According to data insights  from PriceSpy, the fully impartial price and product comparison service, Sony PlayStation is dominating the New Zealand gaming world.

Based on historical clicks, the most popular game right now is God of War, claiming the top spot for four consecutive months.  Following closely behind is Detroit: Become Human.  Since its release in May 2018, it has quickly become the second most-popular game of the moment.

 Top Games for July 2018

  1. God of War (PS4)
  2. Detroit: Become Human (PS4)
  3. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Switch)
  4. Octopath Traveler (Switch)
  5. Gran Turismo: Sport (VR) (PS4)

Top Games for June 2018

  1. God of War (PS4)
  2. Detroit: Become Human (PS4)
  3. Horizon: Zero Dawn Complete Edition (PS4)
  4. Far Cry 5 (PS4)
  5. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Switch)

Top Games for May 2018

  1. God of War (PS4)
  2. Detroit: Become Human (PS4)
  3. Far Cry 5 (PS4)
  4. Gran Turismo: Sport (VR) (PS4)
  5. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Switch)

 Top Games for April 2018

  1. God of War (PS4)
  2. Far Cry 5 (PS4)
  3. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Switch)
  4. Destiny 2 (PS4)
  5. Grand Theft Auto V (PC)

Halo Fireteam Raven: A pictoral essay

As I mentioned earlier this week, I was in Auckland for work so was able to head along to the New Zealand launch of the Halo Fireteam Raven arcade machine at Timezone in Auckland’s Wairau Valley.

It was nice event, with like-minded individuals chatting, eating delicious nibbles, imbibing fluids and, of course, being among the first in NZ to play the dual-screen, four-player Halo Fireteam Raven arcade machine.

Short verdict? It’s good. It’s very, very, very good. Actually, it’s a helluva lotta fun, letting you fill the combat boots of a Halo spartan taking on the covenant hordes – with some mates along for the ride.

Feast your eyes on these images of some obligatory Spartans controlling Spartans in Halo Fireteam Raven & some video of the game in action.

Sadly, the machine was too big to to fit in my carry on luggage for the flight home a couple of days later.

 

Halo Fireteam Raven launches in NZ tomorrow night

There’s a new Halo game launching in New Zealand tomorrow night – but you can’t buy it at your local retailer or play it on your Xbox One (or One X console).

Halo: Fireteam Raven is the first arcade edition of Microsoft’s much-loved FPS game Halo to come to New Zealand – and it’s getting its first outing at Timezone Xtreme Entertainment Wairau in Auckland tomorrow night (August 28)

The arcade game lets  four players either play cooperatively, or compete against each other in the Halo universe, and boasts a 130-inch, 4K  widescreen and 5.1 surround sound. Halo: Fireteam Raven lets fans of the Halo franchise play alongside Master Chief in the battle to ward off the enemy forces of the Covenant and the Flood infestation.

Here’s the official trailer for the game:

As luck would have it, I’m actually in Auckland tomorrow night for work so I’ll be popping along to Timezone Wairau to check out the Fireteam Raven and the festivities I’ll  post images to my twitter feed (@GamejunkieNZ) during the night, too,  if you want to see what the arcade machine looks like.

Also, if you attending the event and see me, come say hi!